Tuesday March 31, 2020

Turmeric: The Magical Ingredient That Boosts Immunity

Boost your immunity with turmeric

0
//
turmeric
Here are some health issues and how turmeric can keep them at bay. Pixabay

BY ADITI ROY

Health is the biggest wealth in everyone’s life, even more so during the present unforeseen times when we are grappling with the deadly Coronavirus attack.

“Immunity” is the body’s natural defence against disease-causing bacteria and virus which can considerably reduce the odds of getting sick. It is only due to the weak immunity that people are getting affected with the widespread coronavirus and other such pandemics.

So, to fortify our immune system, we should look into the ancient wisdom of our Indian kitchen and what a better way than to fall back to good-old turmeric, which is loaded with anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and anti-bacterial properties due to the presence of curcumin. Add it to your food while cooking, temper your favourite curry with it or simply add a dash to make yourself a glorious golden milk.

“Curcumin has known immune system modulation properties and it alters immune response so as to avoid hypersensitivity reaction. Bronchial problems actually result from the hypersensitive reaction of the immune system and Curcumin helps balance these reactions – proves to be a fast relief,” explains Dr Saurabh Arora, inventor of SNEC30, Arbro Pharmaceuticals.

turmeric
Turmeric is loaded with anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and anti-bacterial properties due to the presence of curcumin. Pixabay

Turmeric aids in making our immunity stronger, the main life-saving ingredient in turmeric is about 3-5 % of Curcumin; a phyto-derivative, which contains healing properties. This ingredient can helo you lead a healthy lifestyle. Here are some health issues and how turmeric can keep them at bay:

Cough and Cold – As the temperature changes from cold to warm, it is very common for individuals to catch a common cold or flu. Turmeric helps the body naturally cleanse the respiratory tract, Turmeric helps fight the infection and it’s anti-inflammatory qualities relieve individuals from the direct impact of cold and flu.

Respiratory Ailments – People having bronchial problems like Sinsuits, Sinus and many faces a lot of problems due to lower immunity. Curcumin can be helpful in facing such problems and building up the immunity so that there should not be such kind of respiration Problems.

Upper Respiratory Tract Problems – Symptoms results in bronchial asthma, congestion of nose and airway due to inflammation, cough, cold and occasionally, shortness of breath, affecting children, adults, and elderly population. Inflammation constricts the airways and makes it difficult to breathe. This is often related to an exaggerated response by the immune system that leads to chronic inflammation and damage to lung tissue by free radicals. Curcumin inhibits inflammation, relieves congestion and pain and thus improves your breathing.

turmeric
Turmeric helps fight the infection and it’s anti-inflammatory qualities relieve individuals from the direct impact of cold and flu. Pixabay

Viral Replication – Curcumin helps in boosting up the immunity and helps to fight against viral replication of a disease which may have an incubation period ranging from 1 or 2 days to years.

Also Read- Know About the Delhi-Based Fashion Startup “FIO”

Reduces Inflammation – Curcumin suppresses various inflammatory molecules which are responsible for the causes of the damage caused by viruses. It helps in reduces symptoms and provides relief.

Inhibit Viral Replication – Exhibits all the antiviral properties by reducing the replication of the virus. Curcumin hence reduces the viral load. (IANS)

Next Story

Most Infants Consume Added Sugar: Study

Is your toddler consuming added sugar?

0
infants sugar
A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume added sugars. Pixabay

Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of toddlers between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

Please follow NewsGram on Facebook to get updates on the latest news

She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

infants sugar
Most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns. Pixabay

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

The findings showed that toddlers consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news.

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider.Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets; primarily in the form of flavoured yogurts and fruit drinks, a study has found.

A large majority of infants between 6-11 months (61 percent) and toddlers between 12-23 months of age (98 percent) consume these sugars – possibly laying early foundations to unhealthy eating habits, found a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier.

“Our study, which is the first to look at trends in added sugars consumption by infants and toddlers, documents that most infants and toddlers consume added sugars. This has important public health implications since previous research has shown that eating patterns established early in life shape later eating patterns,” explained lead investigator Kirsten A. Herrick.

She cited an earlier study that found that 6-year-olds who had consumed any sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) before the age of one were more than twice as likely to consume an SSB at least once a day compared to 6-year-olds who had not consumed any before the age of one.

Dr. Herrick noted, “Previous research into the diets of children over two years old associated sugar consumption with the development of cavities, asthma, obesity, elevated blood pressure and altered lipid profiles.”

infants sugar
Nearly two-thirds of infants and almost all toddlers consume added sugars in their average daily diets. Pixabay

The findings showed that infants consumed about 1 teaspoon of added sugars daily (equivalent to about 2 percent of their daily caloric intake), while toddlers consumed about 6 tsp of sugars (about 8 percent of their daily caloric intake).

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

The top food sources of added sugars for infants included yogurt, baby snacks and sweets, and sweet bakery products. For toddlers, the top sources included fruit drinks, sweet and baked products, and sugar and candy.

According to Dr. Herrick, parents should be mindful of added sugars levels in the foods chosen when weaning their infants.

Also Read- Night-Shift Workers More Prone To Get Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes

” The transition from a milk-based diet (breast milk and formula) to table foods has an impact on nutrition, taste preference, and eating patterns. More work is needed to understand this critical period.” She recommends discussing which solid foods to introduce during weaning with a child’s healthcare provider. (IANS)