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Twinkle Khanna Apologises for Comments on Akshay Kumar-Mallika Dua Controversy at The Great Indian Laughter Challenge

Twinkle Khanna has put an apology as a facebook post for her stance on the Akshay Kumar-Mallika Dua controversy at The Great Indian Laughter Challenge

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Twinkle Khanna posted a long apology on Facebook on Akshay-Mallika controversy. Wikimedia.

New Delhi, October 3: The Akshay Kumar-Mallika Dua controversy took a great high after his wife, actor-turned-author Twinkle Khanna made an absolute remark by participating in it.

Twinkle Khanna took to twitter to defend Akshay’s comment to Mallika by stating that humour should have been seen in the right context, along with a tweet of two lame jokes meant against Mallika Dua.

Soon after a week when the whole controversy came to a chilling note, Twinkle Khanna penned down her apology on Facebook by asserting her comment as a purely unperspective emotion. In her long facebook post, she articulated that this apology came as a mere weapon to save her family and children from this controversy.

Twinkle wrote, “Unwise Wisecracks -As I reflect on my actions this past week, I realize that I got pulled into this debate not as a social commentator but as a wife and unlike my normal, slightly rational self, my reaction was purely emotional and without perspective, and I have been rather miserable about it ever since. I would like to apologize to everyone who felt that I was trivializing the cause of feminism especially because I strongly believe in equality and have been a feminist from the time I was a young woman, much before I even knew the term. I think this came at a point where I was already reeling from an onslaught of abuse against various members of my family, which started with vicious and personal comments about my mother and went on to a widely shared open letter where the writer as a comeback for my comments about Karva Chauth tried to fling muck at every single member of my family. So when in this latest episode regarding my husband, my five-year-old was also dragged in for something that she had absolutely nothing to do with, I reached breaking point. And with my protective instincts in overdrive, I reacted irrationally with the only tools I have that help me retain my sanity in this fishbowl existence -words and lame jokes -though they have got me into trouble often enough in the past as well.”

Akshay Kumar had given a comment to Mallika Dua on The Great Indian Laughter challenge, by saying, “Aap bell bajao, main aapko bajata hoon.” (In the show, the judges are expected to ring a bell when a contestant performs well on the show).

This seemed unbefitting to Mallika Dua and she took to Twitter to stress on her uncomfortability with the comment by Akshay Kumar. Mallika’s father, journalist Vinod Dua also lashed out at Akshay with a demand for an apology. Later, Mallika had deleted her post, while the post by Vinod Dua’s got discarded due to a copyright issue.

-Prepared by Bhavana Rathi of NewsGram. Twitter @tweet_bhavana

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Quit Facebook Now to Secure Good Grades in Exams

However, even when students used Facebook primarily for educational purposes, it was still a problem for lower performing students

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An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

Parents, take note. If you want your children to score good grades in exams, tell them to quit social media as researchers have found that students whose grades were below average could boost their results if they devoted less time on social networking sites, especially Facebook.

The study, published in the journal Computers & Education, looked at the amount of time first-year university students spent on Facebook, and the impact it had on their grades.

More than 500 students enrolled in the first year subject ‘Introductory Accounting’ at an Australian university took part in the study, with an average age of 19.

The research from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) showed that while high Facachieving students were not affected by the amount of time on Facebook, below average students had significantly lower grades with greater Facebook use.

“Our research shows time spent on social networking platforms puts lower academic achievers at higher risk of failing their course,” said study researcher James Wakefield from the UTS.

Students taking part in the study spent on average nearly two hours a day on Facebook, however some were on the social networking site in excess of eight hours a day.

“Lower achieving students may already be grappling with self-regulation and focus, so it seems time spent on Facebook provides a further distraction from studies,” Wakefield said.

Researchers found that if the students used Facebook for three hours a day – not substantially higher than the average of just under two hours – the difference was around six marks in a 60 mark exam or 10 per cent.

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The Facebook mobile app on an Android smartphone. Wikimedia Commons

While the research applies to university students studying STEM and business degrees, it is likely to also be relevant to high school students who use social media.

For the findings, researchers assessed the students’ general academic achievement using their weighted average mark (WAM) across all of their studies, and surveyed them about their Facebook use.

They also controlled for other factors that might influence their achievement, such as whether they were planning to major in accounting, as well as their age and gender.

“It appears that for students with lower academic achievement, the use of social networking sites replaces study time, whereas high achieving students are able to juggle both,” he said.

Also Read: Tech Giant Google Secretly Gathering Health Information of Millions of US Citizens

According to the researchers, students with below average grades would benefit from switching off notifications on their phones, and either quitting or reducing time spent on Facebook.

The research also looked at why students were using Facebook – whether to keep in touch with family and friends, for entertainment or for study purposes.

However, even when students used Facebook primarily for educational purposes, it was still a problem for lower performing students. (IANS)