Monday September 23, 2019
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Twitter ‘Deeply Sorry’ For Failing To Act on Threatening Tweets

The statement came after Ritchie complained to Twitter after Sayoc's tweets were publicised

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Twitter CEO
This April 26, 2017, photo shows the Twitter app icon on a mobile phone in Philadelphia. According to a study released Jan. 24, 2019, a tiny fraction of Twitter users spread the vast majority of fake news in 2016, with conservatives and older people sharing misinformation more. VOA

Twitter has apologised for failing to act on threatening tweets made by Cesar Sayoc who is suspected of sending improvised explosive devices to Democratic leaders and critics of US President Donald Trump.

“We are investigating what happened and will continue to work to improve how we handle concerns raised by anyone on Twitter,” it said in a statement.On October 11, Sayoc published a threatening tweet to former congressional press secretary Rochelle Ritchie by telling her “We will see you 4 sure”.

Ritchie alerted Twitter of the tweet made from Sayoc’s account, which contained several disturbing images and statements.”Hug your loved ones real close every time you leave you (sic) home,” Sayoc tweeted with Ritchie’s picture and a screenshot of a news story of a dead teenager, Business Insider reported on Saturday.

Ritchie reported the incident to Twitter but the company said it “carefully” reviewed her case and “found that there was no violation of the Twitter Rules against abusive behaviour”, according to a screenshot uploaded by Ritchie.

Twitter
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Later, on Friday, police arrested and charged Sayoc, a pro-Trump activist seen attending a Trump campaign rally in 2017. His suspected social media accounts also featured threatening messages to other Trump critics, including those whose names were on the explosive packages sent to Democratic lawmakers.

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Twitter, then, suspended Sayoc’s account by Friday afternoon.”We made a mistake when Rochelle Ritchie first alerted us to the threat made against her. The tweet clearly violated our rules and should have been removed. We are deeply sorry for that error,” the company said.

The statement came after Ritchie complained to Twitter after Sayoc’s tweets were publicised.  (IANS)

Next Story

Pessimistic Millennials Across the World Storm Twitter with Retirement Plans

A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found that today, just 60 per cent of millennials are considered middle-class, compared to 70 per cent of baby boomers when they were in their twenties

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Twitter, India, Smartphone
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Millennials across the world stormed Twitter with suggestions how they would like to retire, using the hashtag #millennialretirementplans, and most of them had pessimistic and gloomy views about their golden years.

From living in their parents’ basements to colonizing the Mars only to destroy it like Earth, millennials (those born between 1980 and 2000) wished for early death via dark-themed jokes and memes about never been able to retire and putting the blame on Baby Boomers (those born worldwide between 1946 and 1964) and political upheavals.

“Hope we don’t die in our chairs during a meeting that could have been an email,” wrote one user.

“Watch as the environment disintegrates and move to Mars, where we will yet again, destroy another planet,” posted another.

Most of the millennials painted a bleak picture of their retirement plans.

“Why is this even on trending? We all know we’ll never be able to retire,” said another Twitter user.

“Cultivate my kids so they can become successful millionaires and live off of them,” wrote one.

There were several tweets about poor healthcare as a barrier to a good retirement.

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FILE – A man reads tweets on his phone in front of a displayed Twitter logo. VOA

“Work myself to death since healthcare is a debt sentence & social security won’t exist by the time I’m of ‘retiring age’. Or just wait for the nuclear apocalypse,” said one millennial user.

“Early death,” said one.

“Dumpsters are the new tiny houses,” posted another.

A few millennial users, however, made light of the situation.

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“Travelling around the world collecting Pokemon Go,” said a user.

Other comments were: “Have older people pay for you now, have younger people pay for you later,” and “become an anti-social media influencer”.

A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found that today, just 60 per cent of millennials are considered middle-class, compared to 70 per cent of baby boomers when they were in their twenties. (IANS)