Thursday January 23, 2020
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Social Media Sites Twitter, Facebook Remove 500 Posts After EC Flags Them

The agreement was arrived at a meeting between the Election Commission and Internet companies for the staggered Lok Sabha elections that started on Thursday

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TWitter
The logo for Twitter is displayed above a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. vOA

Social media sites, including Twitter and Facebook, pulled down a total of 503 posts from their platforms after the Election Commission flagged them for violating the model code of conduct (MCC) during the “silence period”, the 48-hour period before the conclusion of voting.

EC Director General Dhirendra Ojha told reporters that of these, a whopping 500 posts were removed by Facebook alone. while two posts were removed by Twitter, and one by WhatsApp, after receiving complaints from the poll panel.

“Resolution of eight complaints with Facebook and 39 with Twitter is still awaited,” he added.

facebook, news feed
FILE- The logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York’s Times Square, In this March 29, 2018. VOA

Social media platforms had last month agreed to a voluntary code of ethics under which they had to process any request from the Election Commission to take down content within three hours during the 48-hour period before voting days.

The agreement was arrived at a meeting between the Election Commission and Internet companies for the staggered Lok Sabha elections that started on Thursday.

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This is the first time that such a code is applicable on social media companies which have seen largescale political advertisements and campaigning in recent elections. (IANS)

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Twitter to Clearview AI: Stop Downloading Images to Build Facial Recognition Database

Stop collecting images says Twitter to facial recognition app

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Twitter
Twitter has told law enforcement app maker Clearview AI to stop downloading images from its platform to build its facial recognition databases as it violates its policies. Pixabay

Twitter has told law enforcement app maker Clearview AI to stop downloading images from its platform to build its facial recognition databases as it violates its policies.

The controversial app uses over three billion images to find a match. These images have been sourced from various social media sites including Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

According to The New York Times, Twitter has sent a letter to the startup, saying it must stop collecting photos and other data from its platform “for any reason” and delete any photo that it previously collected.

Twitter
The controversial app uses over three billion images to find a match. These images have been sourced from various social media sites including Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. Pixabay

The cease-and-desist letter accused Clearview AI of violating Twitter’s policies.

Clearview AI app is being used by over 600 law enforcement agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Homeland Security.

According to law enforcement officials, the app had helped them identify suspects in many criminal cases.

The New York-based Clearview AI is not available to the public and a visit to its website yields no result for the common people. Who owns the startup is sort of mysterious.

“Clearview searches the open web. Clearview does not and cannot search any private or protected info, including in your private social media accounts,” says the information on its website.

According to it, “Clearview’s technology has helped law enforcement track down hundreds of at-large criminals, including pedophiles, terrorists and sex traffickers. It is also used to help exonerate the innocent and identify the victims of crimes including child sex abuse and financial fraud”.

Also Read- Instagram Removes IGTV Shortcut Button Due to Lack of Use

However, people are concerned about such mysterious apps.

“As the news of this app spread, women everywhere sighed. Once again, women’s safety both online and in real life has come second place to the desire of tech startups to create a” and monetize a” ever more invasive technology,” Jo O’Reilly, a privacy advocate with Britain-based non-profit ProPrivacy, told Digital Trends. (IANS)