Sunday May 20, 2018
Home Lead Story Twitter Moves...

Twitter Moves its Core Infrastructure to Google Cloud

The Hadoop compute system is the core of Twitter's data platform, and the company runs multiple large Hadoop clusters that are among the biggest in the world.

0
//
18
Google.
Google. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Twitter will move some of its core infrastructure to Google’s Cloud Platform for better data management, the company has announced.

“We are excited to announce that we are working with Google Cloud to move cold data storage and our flexible compute Hadoop clusters to Google Cloud Platform,” Parag Agrawal, Chief Technology Officer at Twitter, said in a blog post on Thursday.

“This will enable us to enhance the experience and productivity of our engineering teams working with our data platform,” he added.

"We are excited to announce that we are working with Google Cloud to move cold data storage and our flexible compute Hadoop clusters to Google Cloud Platform," Parag Agrawal, Chief Technology Officer at Twitter, said in a blog post on Thursday.
Twitter logo, Pixabay

Hadoop from Apache is an open-source software for organising Big Data.

The Hadoop compute system is the core of Twitter’s data platform, and the company runs multiple large Hadoop clusters that are among the biggest in the world.

“In fact, our Hadoop file systems host more than 300PB of data across tens of thousands of servers,” Agrawal said.

Google Cloud Platform’s data solutions and trusted infrastructure will provide Twitter with the technical flexibility and consistency that its platform requires.

Also Read: Facebook Ensuring Its AI System to be Equally Neutral For All

The migration, when complete, will enable faster capacity provisioning, increased flexibility, access to a broader ecosystem of tools and services and improvements to security.

“Architecturally, we will also be able to separate compute and storage for this class of Hadoop workloads, which has a number of long-term scaling and operational benefits,” the post read. (IANS)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Report: Amazon, Google Lead Global Smart Speaker Market, Apple Stands Fourth

According to market research firm Strategy Analytics, global smart speaker shipments reached 9.2 million units in the first quarter

0
//
5
Report: Amazon, Google Lead Global Smart Speaker Market, Apple Stands Fourth
Report: Amazon, Google Lead Global Smart Speaker Market, Apple Stands Fourth. Pixabay

Amazon and Google accounted for 70 per cent share of the global smart speaker shipments in the first quarter of 2018, with Apple selling 600,000 HomePods in the period, a new report said on Friday.

According to market research firm Strategy Analytics, global smart speaker shipments reached 9.2 million units in the first quarter.

With 43.6 per cent market share, Amazon shipped an impressive four million smart speakers during the quarter though its global market share nearly halved from the same period in 2017.

Google (26.5 per cent market share with 2.4 million sales) and Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba (7.6 per cent market share) consolidated their number two and three rankings, while Apple with six per cent share became the fourth largest smart speaker brand worldwide.

Apple stands fourth in Global Smart Speaker Market
Apple stands fourth in Global Smart Speaker Market. Pixabay

“Amazon and Google accounted for a dominant 70 per cent share of global smart speaker shipments in Q1 2018 although their combined share has fallen from 84 per cent in Q4 2017 and 94 per cent in the year ago quarter,” said David Watkins, Director at Strategy Analytics.

This is partly as a result of strong growth in the Chinese market for smart speakers where both Amazon and Google are currently absent.

“Alibaba and Xiaomi are leading the way in China and their strength in the domestic market alone is proving enough to propel them into the global top five,” he added.

You May Also Like: Amazon launches Kindle Lite App for Android in India

Today’s smart speakers are by no means the finished article but they have captured the consumer imagination.

“We are clearly heading towards a time in the not too distant future when voice becomes a standard mode of technology interaction alongside established approaches like keyboard, mouse and touchscreen,” Watkins said. (IANS)