Monday January 21, 2019
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Twitter Planning to Allow Users To Test New Conversation Features

Those who participate in the test programme would be able to share their feedback with Twitter

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Twitter
New Twitter bug exposed Android users' private tweets. Pixabay

Twitter is planning to allow users to try out new features such as status updates to encourage conversations among its users, a media report said.

In an interview to Engadget at Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2019, a top Twitter executive said that the social media platform would try to involve its users in testing the features before formally rolling them out for all.

“We want to develop a service for the people that are using it, and we have to involve people in that way,” Sara Haider, Director of Product Management at Twitter, was quoted as saying.

“We have a platform that the world uses to speak their mind, why not use that as part of our development process?”

Twitter CEO
Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

Twitter is set to start testing the programme in the coming weeks, and while anyone will be able to apply to join, only a few thousand users are actually going to get in, the report said.

Those who participate in the test programme would be able to share their feedback with Twitter.

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“We’re making some pretty big changes to the way conversations look and feel on Twitter, and we don’t want to just unveil that one day and what if you don’t like it or it’s not working for you?,” said Haider.

“We really want to bring our community along for this journey and be a part of this. We want to do this kind of thing more often,” Haider added. (IANS)

Next Story

A Bug in Twitter Exposes Private Tweets of Some Android Users

Twitter is also facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system

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Twitter
New Twitter bug exposed Android users' private tweets. Pixabay

A bug in Twitter exposed private tweets of some Android users for over five years when they made changes in their settings, like changing the email address linked to their accounts.

According to the micro-blogging platform, the bug (now fixed) disabled the “Protect your Tweets” setting if certain account changes were made on Android devices.

The bug didn’t affect people using Twitter on iOS or desktop, Twitter said on Thursday.

“You may have been impacted by this issue if you had protected Tweets turned on in your settings, used Twitter for Android, and made certain changes to account settings such as changing the email address associated with your account between November 3, 2014, and January 14, 2019.

“People on iOS or the web were not impacted. We fixed the issue on January 14, and we’ll provide updates if other important information becomes available,” Twitter said on its Help page.

The company said it has informed those who were affected by the bug, and has turned “Protect your Tweets” back on for them if it was disabled.

Twitter CEO
Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

“We encourage you to review your privacy settings to ensure that your aProtect your Tweets’ setting reflects your preferences,” said Twitter, adding it is sorry that this happened.

In May last year, Twitter asked its 336 million users to change their passwords after it discovered a bug that stored passwords in plain text in an internal system.

Twitter said it found no sign that hackers accessed the exposed data but advised users that they should enter a new password on all services where their current password has been used.

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Another bug in Twitter’s platform for third-party app developers exposed some Direct Messages (DMs) from nearly 3 million users to outsiders, the micro-blogging platform admitted in September.

The bug ran from May 2017 and after discovering it, Twitter said it fixed the bug to prevent data from being unintentionally sent to the incorrect developer.

Twitter is also facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system. (IANS)