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Two Air India staff, seven Nepalese held for human trafficking

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New Delhi Two Air India staff and seven Nepalese women have been arrested at the Indira Gandhi International Airport (IGIA) here on charge of involvement in human trafficking, CISF said on Wednesday.

 

The Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) personnel apprehended four Napalese women on Tuesday morning.   Three others were held on Monday night at the airport for possessing forged immigration documents.

Puja Tamang, 20, Malati Rai, 26, and Laxmi Rai, 41, were held on Monday around 8 p.m. at the international retail area of Terminal-3 when they were slated to travel to Dubai.human trafficking1

“They arrived from Ahmedabad and were issued boarding passes for the Dubai flight of Air India at the international transfer counter. They tried to mislead our officials that they arrived here from Kathmandu,” CISF spokesperson Hemendra Singh said.

According to the official, four more women passengers were held in the boarding area on Tuesday morning.

Krishna Devi, 29, Uma Bhujel, 31, Sharmila Thapa, 23, and Shova Kumari Pariyar, 28, arrived from Ahmadabad and were also supposed to travel to Dubai.

“As the documents of all the women passengers were found forged, they were handed over to immigration officials who later handed them to police for further legal action,” Hemendra Singh said.

Delhi Police arrested Air India staff, identified as duty manager Kapil, 30, and customer service executive Manish, 28, in connection with the case.

IANS

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Bride Sale in India: Buy A Wife Policy

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Human Trafficking
Bride Slavery in India: Abhishek Suresh

Bride Sale: Story of transformation of Indian Bride into Slave Bride

Samridhi Nain

Bride Sale in India seems to be trending in Haryana, a state with the lowest sex ratio, even marriage continues to be a way of exploitation as Indian brides for marriage are purchased at cattle rate and trafficked into the states of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, and Punjab.
These ‘brides’ are imported from poverty-stricken states like Jharkhand, Bihar, Orrisa, West Bengal & Assam, where the traffickers either take advantage of the family’s poverty or abduct the young girls varying anywhere between the ages of 15 and 30, according to 2013 National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).
The bride sale practice has been completely normal in the northern states due to the acute shortage of girls because of practices like sex selection and female foeticide. But if the reports are to be believed then even if not a single case of female foeticide takes place in Haryana, it would still take 50 years to get the numbers back to normal from India’s sex ratio today. However, the problem remains as locals & Khap leaders keep refusing to accept the facts at hand. Some believe it is the education of women that is the root problem because they want to marry a man who is also well-educated, whereas some believe that there has always been a shortage of girls but before where one woman would take care of five brothers, now, it requires five separate women to do the same.
As Haryana keeps preferring the male child and that male child grows up to prefer a bride, the best solution available at hand remains of these women who are bought at a price varying on their age, beauty & virginity and once bought, they are turned into a slave bride. Once married, these women can be resold as they are not viewed as a respected member but a commodity as they are not considered to be entitled to any inheritance by the family.
Human Trafficking to Bride Sale
Stencil of Missing Girls Project, Wikimedia Commons
A field study, covering 92 villages of Mahendragarh, Sirsa, Karnal, Sonipat & Mewat districts had been conducted on the impact of the sex ratio on marriage which covered over 10,000 households and found that 9,000 married women were bought from other states. The study was conducted by NGO Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra but the families kept denying of any exchange of money for the bride.
In 2016, the ministry of women and child development came up with India’s first comprehensive anti-trafficking laws under ‘Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection & Rehabilitation) Bill, 2016 but the bill faces many challenges and is believed to not achieve its objectives of preventing trafficking & providing protection & rehabilitation to trafficked victims. Activists also believe that the bill will be able to do very little to stop the bride sale.
With such haunting demographics at hand, the hope still remains that sooner or later, the government might realize the need for stringent implementation of the rules & regulations to stop the violation of these young women at the hands of sex traffickers and quell this ‘Buy A Bride’ policy.
-Samridhi is a student of Philosophy Hons. at the University of Delhi.

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