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Two Indian-American Authors Shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize 2017

Siddhartha Mukherjee and Paul Kalanithi have been shortlisted for the 30,000 pound Wellcome Book Prize

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Wellcome Book Prize, 2017, Source: wellcomebookprize.org
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London, Mar 15, 2017: Two Indian-American authors Siddhartha Mukherjee for his book “The Gene” and Paul Kalanithi for his book “When Breath Becomes Air” have been shortlisted under the non-fiction category for the 30,000 pound Wellcome Book Prize. The Wellcome Book Prize is themed on works of fiction and non-fiction on health and medicine.

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New York born Kalanithi was a Standford neurosurgeon, his ‘When Breath Becomes Air’ chronicles his life from being a medical student to a neurosurgeon, a patient and a father, till before his death at the age of 37 from lung cancer while still working on his book. It is the first posthumously published title to be shortlisted for the Wellcome Book Prize, mentioned PTI report.

Delhi-born Mukherji, a Pulitzer Prize winning author and assistant professor of medicine at New York’s Columbia University, in ‘The Gene’ writes about his family and the recurring pattern of mental illness in his own family. The book highlights the importance of genetics in everyday life and question our advancement which has led to our ability to alter human genome. Mukherji’s ‘The Emperor of All Maladies’ was nominated in 2011 for the Wellcome Book Prize.

The 2017 winner of the Wellcome Book Prize will be announced at an evening ceremony on April 24.

– Prepared by Upama Bhattacharya. Twitter @Upama_myself

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USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

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Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)

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