Monday December 17, 2018
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Two Indians among dead in New Zealand car crash

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Wellington: In a tragic incident, two Indians were named among the victims of a car crash along Auckland’s Muriwai beach. The unfortunate accident was revealed in a media report.
newDilpreet Singh, Pulkit Malhotra, Imad Dib and Syed Haris Jafri were traveling along the beach in a Mitsubishi Pajero when it rolled over on Sunday. The men were killed after they were thrown out of the vehicle in the crash, the New Zealand Herald reported on Monday citing police.

“The fact that the occupants have all been ejected from the vehicle would suggest that they may not have been wearing seat belts, but this will be confirmed once the car has been examined,” Inspector Trevor Beggs was quoted as saying.

Beggs added that based on witness information, police believed the car was traveling at speed along the water’s edge.

“It’s either struck an object or has hit sand. The vehicle has then flipped and rolled several times,” he said.

Singh, Dib and Jafri had been working at Auckland’s Queens Academic Group for the past one year, while Malhotra had recently arrived as a tourist.

(With inputs from IANS)

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After Being Stranded, 145 Pilot Whales Die In New Zealand

Marine mammals are frequently stranded on New Zealand's coasts and the average number of operations carried out by environmental officials is about 85 per year

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Pilot whales
Pilot whales. Flickr

About 145 pilot whales died in New Zealand after being stranded during the weekend on Stewart Island in the extreme south of the country, officials said on Monday.

A hiker alerted authorities on Saturday night about the situation of the whales, who were stranded in Mason Bay in two separate groups about two kilometers apart, a Department of Conservation of New Zealand release said.

Pilot whales
Almost 150 whales die in mass stranding. BBC

Half of the whales were dead when rescuers arrived and the condition of the rest, by the time they were found, was so bad it was decided to euthanise them, said Ren Leppens, operations manager at Rakiura.

“Sadly, the likelihood of being able to successfully re-float the remaining whales was extremely low. The remote location, lack of nearby personnel and the whales’ deteriorating condition meant the most humane thing to do was to euthanise,” said Leppens.

Pilot whales
A volunteer looks after a whale, part of a pod of stranded pilot whales.

Pilot whales, also called long-finned pilot whale, are a specimen with a bulging forehead and a robust body that can reach between six and seven meters in length, Xinhua news agency reported.

Also Read: The Ocean And Its Climate Crisis

Marine mammals are frequently stranded on New Zealand’s coasts and the average number of operations carried out by environmental officials is about 85 per year, most of them to save these animals individually.

The reasons why whales and dolphins can become stranded have not been clarified, although it is attributed to diseases, navigation errors, sudden changes in tides, being chased by predators or extreme weather conditions. (IANS)