Saturday November 23, 2019

UK startup rolls out first ever HIV self-test kit

0
//
Picture credit: psfk.com

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Want to get rid of the usual brouhaha and scathing stares while entering a clinic for HIV test? Well, here is an option – the first ever HIV self-testing kit.

Picture credit: psfk.com
Picture credit: psfk.com

Despite heading to a new era etched with modernity and advancement, there are certain issues which are never deliberated openly and people prefer to shove them inside the closet. One such issue is HIV. The very thought of appearing for a HIV test vexes us owing to the repercussions involved, specially societal issues. However, this wouldn’t be the case anymore as U.K. based startup BioSURE has rolled out the first HIV self-testing kit.

The self-testing kit allows individuals to test their blood samples and subsequently execute a test for AIDS.

The device guarantees 99.7% accuracy, which means that out of every 1000 positive results only three would be incorrect. The device is the only one having a legal approval in U.K. with a European Conformity (CE) mark.

The BioSURE HIV Self Test Kit is priced at £29.95 (US$46.80) and would be shipped in discrete packages.

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is an infective microorganism that causes AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The self-test would enable an individual to detect the presence of such antibodies when a person is infected with HIV.

Despite a string of advancements made in laying off the disease, the stigma regarding the same still persists, owing to which many people consider it a strenuous task to go to clinics for a test. However, the newfound kit would be a stress buster, removing the possibilities of being looked down on.

Next Story

People Living with HIV Significantly Elevates Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

They found that people living with HIV are at an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses

0
HIV, COPD, Disease
For the study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers combined data from 20 separate observational studies and examined 55 different illnesses. Pixabay

People living with HIV have a significantly elevated risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and coughs, heart disease, pregnancy mortality and sepsis, anemia and bone fractures, according to a study.

For the study, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers combined data from 20 separate observational studies and examined 55 different illnesses.

They found that people living with HIV are at an increased risk of contracting specific diseases and illnesses, some of which are more commonly associated with ageing.

“By pooling data from different studies, we have been able to show for the first time that even with the rise in life expectancy amongst people living with HIV, this population now seems to be disproportionately affected by chronic illnesses often attributable to lifestyle issues such as smoking, drug and alcohol use or more commonly associated with an older population,” said study researcher Lee Smith from Anglia Ruskin University in the UK.

HIV, COPD, Disease
People living with HIV have a significantly elevated risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and coughs, heart disease, pregnancy mortality and sepsis, anemia and bone fractures. Pixabay

Although the number of people contracting HIV is declining, approximately 1.8 million people are infected every year and HIV remains one of the world’s major health issues.

In recent years, people with HIV have benefited from improved access to antiretroviral treatment. However, increased life expectancy and a lower immunity has meant higher levels of comorbidity, with people living with HIV also more likely to suffer from other illnesses.

The greater prevalence of age-associated diseases may be explained by the persistent immunodeficiency and inflammation connected with HIV. There are also adverse effects associated with antiretroviral treatment.

Also Read- Doctors can Help Parents and Teens Communicate about Sex

Previous studies have also suggested that people with HIV in developed countries, as a population, often exhibit greater risk factors associated with non-AIDS related illnesses, such as smoking, drug use and alcohol use. (IANS)