Wednesday March 20, 2019
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U.S. Supermarket Delivers Using Unmanned Vehicle

Kroger said the service would be available in Scottsdale at its unit Fry's Food Stores

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Kroger, Technology
A woman walks in front of an unmanned delivery vehicle known as the R1 in this handout photo provided by Kroger. VOA

U.S. supermarket chain Kroger Co said on Tuesday it has started using unmanned autonomous vehicles to deliver groceries Scottsdale, Arizona in partnership with Silicon Valley startup Nuro.

The delivery service follows a pilot program started by the companies in Scottsdale in August and involved Nuro’s R1, a custom unmanned vehicle.

The R1 uses public roads and has no driver and is used to only transport goods.

Kroger’s deal with Nuro underscores the stiff competition in the U.S. grocery delivery market with supermarket chains angling for a bigger share of consumer spending.

Kroger, Technology, Vehicle
A man unloads goods from an unmanned vehicle known as the R1 in this handout photo provided by Kroger.VOA

Peers Walmart Inc and Amazon.com Inc have also invested heavily in their delivery operations by expanding their offerings and shortening delivery times.

Walmart, Ford Motor Co and delivery service Postmates Inc said last month they would collaborate to deliver groceries and other goods to Walmart customers and that could someday use autonomous vehicles.

Also Read: Robots May Be Able to Perform C-Sections Soon

Kroger said the service would be available in Scottsdale at its unit Fry’s Food Stores for $5.95 with no minimum order requirement for same-day or next-day deliveries. (VOA)

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Here’s How to Boost up Businesses in Times of Evolving Tech

The lab will develop science-backed hiring apps and tools that can measure diverse traits and abilities

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Team, Scrum Methodology
The performance-conducive transparency and actual visibility of the team ensure great team performances. Pixabay

Focusing on the science behind what makes some start-ups thrive and others fail, Australian researchers have unveiled a new lab that will use cutting edge neuroscience to advise how businesses can thrive in a world of constant technological change.

The “Future Minds Lab”, launched at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney this week, will include a team of 20 scientists, designers and psychologists to study the fundamental brain science and psychology behind innovation.

The team will work with industry partners to produce products and services to improve the way institutions and businesses approach different forms of innovation.

“Using fundamental research and development, our team is creating products and programmes to ensure workplaces and businesses are more resilient and better equipped to adapt to constant technological change,” Joel Pearson, Professor at the varsity, said in a statement.

“By using cutting edge neuroscience, we can discover what makes successful founders, teams and companies,” Pearson explained.

Business
Think about what you want to get from your employees. Pixabay

The lab, a 300-square metre custom built centre with virtual reality rooms, testing stations, brain stimulation devices, neuroimaging tech and research offices, will be used to develop products such as customised cognitive tests for start-ups and psychological interventions and online education programmes.

“Using technology such as gamified objective tests and mobile brain measurement, we will be able to develop tests that measure traits and abilities like creativity, resilience…” the Professor said.

Also Read- Tech Giant Apple Hits Back at Spotify For Antitrust Complaint: Report

The lab will develop science-backed hiring apps and tools that can measure diverse traits and abilities. These tools will leverage the latest Machine Learning (ML) algorithms to assess job candidates’ fit for specific roles and organisations.

“Workshops will be delivered to start-up founders that aim to increase their resilience and stress management techniques, decrease burnout, and help founders enhance their mental fitness,” Pearson noted. (IANS)