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Uber Joins Hands with DocsApp to Avail Free Medical Consultations for its Drivers

Additionally, the drivers will be sent a pre-recorded message to help them avail the services, and they will have a separate customer support number for this

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Uber, bengaluru
Photo shows an exterior view of the headquarters of Uber in San Francisco. (VOA)

Cab aggregator Uber on Tuesday partnered DocsApp to avail free medical consultations, subsidised prescription medicines along with lab tests for its driver and delivery partners across Uber rides and Uber Eats platforms.

“We are delighted to announce our partnership with DocsApp which aims to enhance the quality of life of our driver-partners, and their families, by providing them with increased access to medical consultations. Backed with this partnership, we believe our driver-partners will be better equipped to deliver their best when driving on our platform,” Pavan Vaish, Head of Central Operations (Rides), India SA Uber said in a statement.

Under the partnership, the driver and delivery partners will be able to get medical assistance at a nominal cost for themselves and up to 5 family members.

uber eats
Delivery men working with the food delivery apps Uber Eats and Swiggy wait to pick up an order outside a restaurant in Mumbai, India, Feb. 6, 2019. VOA

Through this partnership, they can get access to free unlimited consultations from doctors on call, along with up to 20 per cent discount on medicines and up to 40 per cent discount on lab tests anywhere in India.

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Over 50,000 Uber India driver-partners have already registered on the online doctor consultation platform.

Additionally, the drivers will be sent a pre-recorded message to help them avail the services, and they will have a separate customer support number for this. (IANS)

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Report: Express Grieving Conditions for Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector

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Developing Countries
Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants, but their Condition is not good in Developing Countries. Wikimedia Commons

A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of sanitation workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk.

Sanitation workers everywhere occupy the lowest rung of society and are stigmatized and marginalized because they do the dirty work that other people do not want to do.

The report’s authors – the International Labor Organization, the World Health Organization, the World Bank and Water Aid – say they hope to raise awareness on the plight of sanitation workers and the dehumanizing conditions under which they are forced to work. For example, the report says that many sanitation workers aren’t given the safety training or equipment needed to protect them when handling effluent or fecal sludge.

World Health Organization spokesman Christian Lindmeier says sanitation workers make an important contribution to public health at the risk of their own lives. Poor sanitation, he says, causes more than 430,000 deaths from diarrhea every year and is linked to the spread of other diseases such as cholera, dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis A and polio.

“Sanitation workers are the people who work in jobs such as cleaning toilets, emptying pits and septic tanks, cleaning sewage and manholes and operating pumping stations and treatment plants.… Waste must be correctly treated before being disposed of or used. However, workers often come into direct contact with human waste, working with no equipment or no protection to remove it by hand which exposes them to a long list of health hazards and diseases,” Lindmeier said.

Developing Countries
A new report by leading health and safety agencies finds millions of Sanitation Workers in Developing Countries are forced to work under horrific conditions that put their health and lives at risk. VOA

Authors of the report say sanitation workers in developing countries largely operate in the informal sector. They labor under abusive conditions, have no rights or social protections and are poorly paid.

ALSO READ: WHO Demands Strict Regulations on Vaping Products

The study calls on countries to rectify these wrongs. It urges governments to enact laws and regulations that improve working conditions for sanitation workers and protect their safety and health. It says sanitation workers must be given the equipment and training necessary for the safe, proper disposal of waste. (VOA)