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UIDAI Launches More Secure mAadhaar App

A user needs to register the Aadhaar profile in the mAadhaar app

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Aadhaar Card Reader Logo
Aadhaar Card Reader Logo. Wikimedia Commons

To make the mAadhaar application more secure, the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) has launched its new version, both for Android and iOS devices.

According to the UIDAI, users should delete the previous version and install the new version immediately. Also, third-party applications are not supported by the UIDAI.

Users can download Aadhaar card, offline eKYC, show or scan QR code, order a reprint, update address, verify Aadhaar, verify mail/email, retrieve UID/EID, request for Address Validation Letter and also check the status of various online requests.

Sample of Aadhaar card
This image shows a Sample of Aadhaar card. Wikimedia Commons

The multilingual app supports 13 languages, including English and 12 Indian languages — Hindi, Bengali, Odia, Urdu, Telugu, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Gujarati, Punjabi, Marathi and Assamese.

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Through the mAadhaar app, the resident can also lock or unlock their Aadhaar or biometric authentication.

To avail personalised Aadhaar services, a user needs to register the Aadhaar profile in the mAadhaar app. But a resident with or without Aadhaar can install the app in his/her smartphone. (IANS)

Next Story

Social Networking Giant Facebook Blames Apple iOS for Bezos’ Phone Hacking

WhatsApp provides end-to-end encryption by default, which means only the sender and recipient can view the messages

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Social Media, Facebook, Authenticity, Posts
The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple's App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

Facebook has blamed Apple’s operating system for the hacking of Amazon Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos’ phone, saying WhatsApp’s end-to-end encryption is unhackable.

Investigators believe that Bezos’s iPhone was compromised after he received a 4.4MB video file containing malware via WhatsApp – in the same way when phones of 1,400 select journalists and human rights activists were broken into by Pegasus software from Israel-based NSO Group last year.

In an interview to the BBC last week, Facebook’s Vice President of Global Affairs and Communications, Nick Clegg, said it wasn’t WhatsApp’s fault because end-to-end encryption is unhackable and blamed Apple’s operating system for Bezos’ episode.

“It sounds like something on the, you know, what they call the operate, operated on the phone itself. It can’t have been anything on the, when the message was sent, in transit, because that’s end-to-end encrypted on WhatsApp,” Clegg told the show host.

Clegg compared the hack to opening a malicious email, saying that “it only comes to life when you open it”.

According to a report from FTI Consulting, a firm that has investigated Bezos’ phone, after that the video file was received, Bezos’ phone started sending unusually large amounts of outbound data, including his intimate messages with his girlfriend Lauren Sanchez.

Jeff Bezos
Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder and owner of Blue Origin. (Wikimedia commons)

According to Clegg, “something” must have affected the phone’s operating system.

“As sure as you can be that the technology of end-to-end encryption cannot, other than unless you have handset, or you have the message at either end, cannot be hacked into,” he was quoted as saying.

Apple was yet to comment on Facebook’s statement.

The NSO Group has denied it was part of Bezos’ hacking.

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WhatsApp provides end-to-end encryption by default, which means only the sender and recipient can view the messages. But the piece of NSO Group software exploited WhatsApp’s video calling system by installing the spyware via missed calls to snoop on the selected users.

According to leading tech policy and media consultant Prasanto K. Roy, end-to-end encrypted apps (E2EE) do provide security, and messages or calls cannot be intercepted and decrypted en route without enormous computing resources.

“But once anyone can get to your handset, whether a human or a piece of software, the encryption doesn’t matter anymore. Because on your handset, it’s all decrypted,” Roy told IANS recently. (IANS)