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UN Appeals Nations to Reduce Carbon Emissions by 45 Percent by 2030

According to UN, the last four years were the four hottest on record, and winter temperatures in the Arctic have risen by 3 degrees Celsius since 1900

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climate change catastrophe
Greenhouse gases have continued to climb, and "climate change is occurring much faster than anticipated," the report said. Pixabay

Stressing the impact of climate change on people’s lives, the United Nations here on Tuesday appealed all countries to reduce carbon emissions by 45 per cent by 2030.

Addressing mediapersons, Luis Alfonso de Alba, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Summit, said all countries had been asked to formulate plans and demonstrate that addressing climate change issue was “possible”.

Leaders of all countries had been invited to the summit with concrete, realistic plans to enhance their nationally-determined contributions by 2020, in line with reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 45 per cent over the next decade, and net zero emissions by 2050, he said.

carbon emissions
According to UN, the last four years were the four hottest on record, and winter temperatures in the Arctic have risen by 3 degrees Celsius since 1900. Wikimedia Commons

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UN Secretary-General António Guterres has convened the summit in New York in September. According to UN, the last four years were the four hottest on record, and winter temperatures in the Arctic have risen by 3 degrees Celsius since 1900.

Twenty-eight companies with $1.3 trillion market capitalisation were stepping up to set a new level of climate ambition in a response to a call to act ahead of the summit, Alba said. (VOA)

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About 25% Tweets Regarding Climate Change are Produced by Bots, Reveals Study

The study could not identify the people responsible for setting up the bots that were trained to post climate denial messages on Twitter

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Twitter
The researchers found that only five per cent of tweets advocating action to protect the environment were produced by bots. Pixabay

A lot of messages denying the effects of global warming might actually have been written by bots as new research from Brown University in the US found that about 25 per cent of the tweets about climate change that they analysed were produced by automated accounts.

Bots are non-personal or automated accounts that post content to social media platforms.

While the findings of the study are yet to be published, The Guardian newspaper reported them after seeing the draft study.

The results suggest that online conversations about climate change are often distorted due to the activities of the bots.

According to a report in the BBC on Saturday, the research team at Brown University analysed 6.5 million tweets from around the time US President Donald Trump revealed his intention to remove the US from the Paris climate accord in 2017.

The analysis showed a quarter of tweets on climate change were likely posted by bots.

“These findings suggest a substantial impact of mechanized bots in amplifying denials messages about climate change, including support for Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris agreement,” stated the draft study, according to The Guardian.

twitter
A lot of messages denying the effects of global warming might actually have been written by bots as new research from Brown University in the US found that about 25 per cent of the tweets about climate change that they analysed were produced by automated accounts. Pixabay

The study could not identify the people responsible for setting up the bots that were trained to post climate denial messages on Twitter.

For the study, the researchers used a tool from Indiana University called Botometer, which uses an algorithm to assign a score to Twitter accounts based upon the likelihood they are automated.

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The researchers found that only five per cent of tweets advocating action to protect the environment were produced by bots. (IANS)