Wednesday August 22, 2018
Home Politics UN Children&#...

UN Children’s Fund (Unicef) urges Turkey not to use children, refugees as bargaining chips in its latest dispute with European Union

0
//
88
FILE - The United Nations headquarters building is pictured though a window with the UN logo in the foreground. VOA
Republish
Reprint

Geneva, March 18, 2017: The UN Children’s Fund (Unicef) urged Turkey on Friday not to use children, refugees and undocumented migrants as bargaining chips in its latest dispute with the EU, after Ankara threatened again to break the migration agreement.

Unicef humanitarian affairs adviser Lucio Melandri, told a news conference that children should never be used as bargaining chips, and refugees and migrants should not be manipulated for political reasons, Efe news reported.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

Melandri said he was aware of the situation in Turkey, which is home to 3 million Syrian refugees, adding that Unicef does not take a political stance, but asks all parties to consider the protection of children.

Turkey repeatedly threatened the EU to suspend the agreement, closed in March 2016, by which it agreed to receive refugees arriving in Greece from their country, in exchange for economic aid and visa exemptions for its citizens.

The threats have risen sharply since Germany and Holland vetoed the campaign rallies of Turkish ministers in their territories, to support the constitutional reform that would hand over all executive power in Turkey to the president. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Frequency of Brain Tumours Increase in Children With Common Genetic Syndrome

Applying the new criteria to MRI scans will help physicians identify probable tumours.

0
Brain tumours may occur in children with common genetic syndrome
Brain tumours may occur in children with common genetic syndrome, Pixabya

Parents, please take note. The frequency of brain tumours has been underestimated in children with the common genetic syndrome — neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a new study has found.

According to the researchers, this disorder is characterised by birthmarks on the skin and benign nerve tumours that develop in or on the skin. Brain tumours are also known to occur in children and adults with NF1.

They estimated that only 15-20 per cent of kids with NF1 develop brain tumours. But the study, published in the journal Neurology: Clinical Practice, found that the frequency of brain tumours in this population was more than three times higher.

brain tumours can be confused with harmless bright spots, it has never been clear whether finding these abnormalities via MRI should be a cause for concern
Brain tumours can be confused with harmless bright spots, it has never been clear whether finding these abnormalities via MRI should be a cause for concern. Wikimedia Commons

“I’m not delivering the message anymore that brain tumours are rare in NF1. This study has changed how I decide which children need more surveillance and when to let the neuro-oncologists know that we may have a problem,” said senior author David H. Gutmann from the Washington University School of Medicine.

Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of children with NF1 characteristically show bright spots that are absent in the scans of unaffected children. Unlike tumours, they are generally thought to disappear in teenage years, the researchers said.

Since brain tumours can be confused with harmless bright spots, it has never been clear whether finding these abnormalities via MRI should be a cause for concern, they added.

Representation of a Brain Tumour. Flickr
Representation of a Brain Tumor. Flickr

For the study, the team developed a set of criteria to distinguish tumours from other bright spots. The researchers then analysed scans from 68 NF1 patients and 46 children without NF1 for comparison.

Also Read: Taking Care of Mental Health Problems in Children, may Boost Parent’s Mental Health Too 

All but four (94 per cent) of the children with NF1 had bright spots, and none of the children without NF1 did. Further, in 57 per cent of the children with bright spots, at least one of the spots was deemed likely to be a tumour, the research team found.

Applying the new criteria to MRI scans will help physicians identify probable tumours, but that does not mean that all children with NF1 should be scanned regularly, the researchers cautioned. (IANS)