Monday June 17, 2019
Home India UN report: In...

UN report: India lags behind in Asia for representation of women

The report acknowledged that the worldwide average of women in national parliaments augmented in a meagre way from 22.6 per cent in 2015 to 23.3 per cent by the end of 2016

0
//
Women
UN logo. Wikimedia

United Nations, March 7, 2017: A report by a global inter-parliamentary institution on the account of the international women’s day stated that India was the only country in Asia to suffer from “setback” in women’s representation in parliaments in 2016.

The Inter-Parliamentary Union’s (IPU) ‘Women in Parliament’ in 2016 review released ahead of International Women’s Day on March 8 stating about more ambitious measures
needed to be taken for enhancing the representation of women in the parliament.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The reports call for a new approach in which inclusion of more women in decision making is witnessed.

In Asia, women’s representation in parliament increased by 0.5 per cent, from 18.8 per cent in 2015 to 19.3 per cent in 2016.

Moderate increases, were registered in all the countries holding elections – Iran, Japan, Laos, Mongolia, the Philippines, South Korea and Viet Nam – “with one notable exception” of India.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“India recorded the region’s only setback. Reserved seats were successfully introduced for women in local government elections in 1994. However, a proposed constitutional amendment introduced in 2008 and intended to reserve national- level seats for women continues to be bogged down in parliamentary debate,” it stated.

Direct and indirect elections and Government appointments in June and July 2016 sent back a total of 27 women of the 244 members of Rajya Sabha. This was a 1.7 per cent decrement in the number of women to 11.1 per cent from 12.8 per cent at the previous renewals.

The report acknowledged that the worldwide average of women in national parliaments augmented in a meager way from 22.6 per cent in 2015 to 23.3 per cent by the end of 2016.

Follow Newsgram for latest updates from around the world

However, in the recent years, the rate of progress has stabilised accentuating the need for relentless efforts in order to accomplish gender balance in politics.

“We must seize the opportunity to build on the successes of recent years because hard-won progress can often be fragile and readily lost, particularly at a time when engaging in politics has become even more challenging.

“Parliaments are crucial to ensuring women are among the world’s most high-profile leaders and to strengthening the policies and legislation needed to meet the goal of gender equality and women’s full and equal participation at all levels by 2030,” IPU Secretary General Martin Chungong spoke.

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

Next Story

UN Warns Millions in South Sudan to Face Acute Shortage of Food in Coming Weeks

The United Nations estimates nearly 7 million South Sudanese, or 61 percent of the population, will face acute levels of food insecurity in about six weeks' time

0
south sudan, acute hunger
A refugee from South Sudan transports food she received from the World Food Program (WFP) in Palorinya settlement camp for distribution, in Moyo district northern Uganda, Oct. 26, 2017. VOA

U.N. agencies warn millions of people in South Sudan will face acute shortages of food by the end of July, with tens of thousands experiencing famine-like conditions. A new report released Friday by the U.N.’s World Food Program, Food and Agriculture Organization and UNICEF, along with the government of South Sudan, assesses the food situation in the world’s youngest country.

Food is always in short supply during South Sudan’s lean season. But, this year, the situation is worse than usual because of a much-delayed rainfall on top of an economic crisis and population displacement due to conflict.

south sudan, hunger
The agency currently is providing food for 2.77 million people. Pixabay

The United Nations estimates nearly 7 million South Sudanese, or 61 percent of the population, will face acute levels of food insecurity in about six weeks’ time.

World Food Program spokesman Herve Verhoosel tells VOA the crisis will be especially dire for thousands of people living in inaccessible parts of former Jonglei, Lakes, and Upper Nile states.

“Twenty-one thousand people in the country are in a very catastrophic situation.  They need very urgently access to that food,” said Verhoosel. “We know that urgent food assistance is needed in most of the country, especially because of the conflict and because of the season. And, that is at the end of July that we will have a very difficult time and most of the people will need that food assistance.”

hunger, south sudan
The United Nations estimates nearly 7 million South Sudanese, or 61 percent of the population, will face acute levels of food insecurity in about six weeks’ time. Pixabay

Verhoosel says people living in the worst-affected areas are experiencing famine-like conditions, with little or nothing to eat or to feed their families.  The agency currently is providing food for 2.77 million people. Verhoosel says the WFP plans to scale up aid to reach more than 5 million by the end of the year.

ALSO READ: Zimbabwe Faces Shortage of Antiretroviral Drugs

The U.N. children’s fund and partners say they too will scale up services to reach more children affected by severe acute malnutrition with therapeutic feeding.

The Food and Agriculture Organization reports it is providing new varieties of seed suited to local conditions.  It says it also is training farmers in techniques that will reduce losses from drought and flooding. (VOA)