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Under Time Pressure to Answer, People may Lie to you by Responding with Socially Desirable Answer

The idea has always been that we have a divided mind -- an intuitive, animalistic type and a more rational type

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Time, Pressure, Answer
The method of 'answer quickly and without thinking', a long staple in psychological research, may be doing many things, but one thing it does is make people lie to you and tell you what they think you want to hear. Pixabay

When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively – be it at work or home – people may lie to you by responding with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, say researchers.

In other words, time pressure does not bring out a person’s good ‘true self’ and people may default to their desire to appear virtuous even if it means misrepresenting themselves.

“The method of ‘answer quickly and without thinking’, a long staple in psychological research, may be doing many things, but one thing it does is make people lie to you and tell you what they think you want to hear,” said John Protzko, a cognitive scientist at University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).

The idea has always been that we have a divided mind — an intuitive, animalistic type and a more rational type.

Time, Pressure, Answer
In other words, time pressure does not bring out a person’s good ‘true self’ and people may default to their desire to appear virtuous even if it means misrepresenting themselves. Pixabay

“The more rational type is assumed to always be constraining the lower order mind. If you ask people to answer quickly and without thinking, it’s supposed to give you sort of a secret access to that lower order mind,” Protzko explained in a paper published in the journal Psychological Science.

To test this assumption, Protzko and UCSB colleague Jonathan Schooler devised a test of 10 simple yes-or-no questions.

Through a survey, respondents were asked to take fewer than 11 seconds, or alternatively, more than 11 seconds to answer each question.

They found that the fast-answering group was more likely to give socially-desirable answers, while the slow answers and the ones who were not given any time constraints (fast or slow) were less likely to do so.

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The team plans to examine previous studies that used the quick-answer technique to see how much results might be driven by participants giving socially-desirable answers. (IANS)

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Children Spend Too Much Time On Electronic Devices: Study

Infants are spending too much time on screen, says a study

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Children using devices
Researchers have found that the amount of time children are spending each day on screen is increasing at an alarming rate. Pixabay

Researchers have found that the amount of time children are spending each day watching television or using a computer or mobile device is increasing at an alarming rate.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, found that children’s daily screen time increased from 53 minutes at age 12 months to more than 150 minutes at 3 years old.

According to the researchers, by age 8, children in US were more likely to log the highest amount of screen time if they had been in home-based childcare or were born to first-time mothers.

“Our results indicate that screen habits begin early, this finding suggests that interventions to reduce screen time could have a better chance of success if introduced early,” said study senior auhtor Edwina Yeung, NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in the US.

Children screen time
By age 8, children in US are more likely to log the highest amount of screen time. Pixabay

For the findings, the research team analysed data from the Upstate KIDS Study, originally undertaken to follow the development of children conceived after infertility treatments and born in New York State from 2008 to 2010.

Mothers of nearly 4,000 children who took part in the study responded to questions on their kids’ media habits when they were 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months of age. They also responded to similar questions when the children were seven and eight years old.

The study compiled additional demographic information on the mothers and children from birth records and other surveys.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends avoiding digital media exposure for children under 18 months of age, introducing children 18 to 24 months of age to screen media slowly, and limiting screen time to an hour a day for children from 2 to 5 years of age.

In the current study, researchers found that 87 per cent of the children had screen time exceeding these recommendations.

However, while screen time increased throughout toddlerhood, by age 7 and 8, screen time fell to under 1.5 hours per day. The researchers believe this decrease relates to time consumed by school-related activities.

Children using electronic devices
87 per cent of the children exceed the recommended screen time. Pixabay

The study authors classified the children into two groups based on how much their average daily screen time increased from age 1 to age 3.

The first group, 73 per cent of the total, had the lowest increase, from an average of nearly 51 minutes a day to nearly an hour and 47 minutes a day.

The second group, 27 per cent of the total, had the highest increase, from nearly 37 minutes of screen time a day to about four hours a day.

Also Read- Consumption Of Sugary Beverages Declines Among US Kids: Study

Higher levels of parental education were associated with lower odds of inclusion in the second group.

In addition, girls were slightly less likely to be in the second group, compared to boys, while children of first-time mothers were more likely to be in the high-increase group, the study said. (IANS)