Wednesday February 19, 2020
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Unfriendly nature of Pakistan towards children

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Islamabad: The criminal justice system in Pakistan is “quite unfriendly to child rights”, said a daily on Monday after a case was registered against a three-year-old child.

An editorial “Children Of Crime” in The Nation said that Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan suspended heads of two police stations of the federal capital on Saturday — one for registering a case against a three-year-old child, and the other for giving false information about arrests of civil society activists.

“The case of the child criminal exposes the extreme illiteracy and barbarity in the ranks of the police. The criminal justice system is quite unfriendly to child rights.”

This is not the first time a minor was booked for a criminal offence. In April 2014, Pakistan made international headlines, when a nine-month-old baby had an FIR registered against him.

According to the FIR, the child and a co-accused tried to kill gas company workers and policemen accompanying them by throwing stones.

The daily said that let’s not forget that the “mindset of the men who work in the police is not isolated from the general population”.

In July 2014, three female members of the Ahmadi community, including a seven-year-old girl and a baby, were killed by a mob in Gujranwala. “For people who can kill children over religious squabbles, booking them for crimes is no large feat.”

“In 2012, an 11-year-old Christian girl suffering from Down’s Syndrome was arrested on blasphemy charges.”

The daily noted that children, “it seems, aren’t safe anywhere”.

“We are a violent nation and the newest victims are our children- in all areas; terrorism, in the hands of the police, in terms of sexual and physical abuses, in forced marriages and conversions, in bonded labour… and the list goes on.

“As these issues were not been reported on or investigated in the past, we have assumed that child abuse in on the rise and is a new phenomenon. However, the moral crisis of the nation is much older and so is our history of child abuse.”(IANS)

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A Nuclear War Between India and Pakistan Can Pose a Threat To Ocean Life, Says Study

A lingering question is whether the survivors could still get food from the sea

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Ocean
For the study, published in Geophysical Research Letters journal, the researchers looked at how climate changes stemming from nuclear war would affect the ocean life. Pixabay

A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, says a study.

“We found that the ocean’s chemistry would change, with global cooling dissolving atmospheric carbon into the upper ocean and exacerbating the primary threat of ocean acidification,” said the study’s co-author Alan Robock, Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University in the US.

For the study, published in Geophysical Research Letters journal, the researchers looked at how climate changes stemming from nuclear war would affect the oceans.

They used a global climate model in which the climate reacted to soot (black carbon) in smoke that would be injected into the upper atmosphere from fires ignited by nuclear weapons. They considered a range of hypothetical nuclear wars, including a relatively small one between India and Pakistan and a large one between the US and Russia.

Excess carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels enters the ocean and reacts with water to form carbonic acid, which decreases ocean pH (makes it more acidic) and lowers levels of carbonate ions. Corals, clams, oysters and other marine organisms use carbonate ions to create their shells and skeletons, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

A more acidic ocean makes it harder to form and maintain shells and skeletons. The massive amount of smoke from a nuclear conflict would block sunlight and cause global cooling, the study said.

The cooling would temporarily boost the pH in the surface ocean over five years and briefly lessen the decline in pH from ocean acidification. But the cooling would also lead to lower levels of carbonate ions for about 10 years, challenging shell maintenance in marine organisms, said researchers.

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A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could worsen the impact of ocean acidification on corals, clams, oysters and other marine life with shells or skeletons, says a study. Pixabay

“We have known for a while that agriculture on land would be severely affected by climate change from nuclear war,” Robock said. “A lingering question is whether the survivors could still get food from the sea. Our study is the first step in answering this question,” Robock added.

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The next step is to combine projected changes in ocean chemistry with projected changes in temperature and salinity and assess their impacts on shellfish and fish stocks throughout the oceans, he said. (IANS)