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UN Security Council members move to Bangladesh and Myanmar for Rohingya crisis

According to the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the overall population of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar in Bangladesh is currently estimated to be over 1 million.

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Members of the UN Security Council have left for Bangladesh and Myanmar to study the Rohingya crisis.
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Members of the UN Security Council have left for Bangladesh and Myanmar to study the Rohingya crisis.

The 15-member panel made a stopover in Kuwait on Friday before flying to Bangladesh where they will visit capital Dhaka and refugee camps in the Cox’s Bazar area, officials said.

After visiting the camps in Bangladesh over the weekend the members will arrive in the Myanmar capital of Nay Pyi Taw on Monday, reports Xinhua news agency.

They will also visit areas in Rakhine state that were affected by the violence beginning last August and from where most of the refugees fled.

According to the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the overall population of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar in Bangladesh is currently estimated to be over 1 million.

Some 670,000 of them arrived in Bangladesh after Rohingya militants launched a deadly attack on Myanmar government forces in Rakhine on August 25, 2017.

Some 8,000 new refugees have arrived since January, Chief UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric told reporters here on Friday.
Stephane Dujarric, IANS

Some 8,000 new refugees have arrived since January, Chief UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric told reporters here on Friday.

“The government and people of Bangladesh have displayed extraordinary generosity toward Rohingya refugees, with support by the international community,” he said.

“The latest round of food distribution reached over 470,000 people. Over 5,000 tube wells and 47,000 latrines have been built, and more than 90,000 children have received primary school education.”

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Humanitarian partners on the ground have also conducted protection monitoring missions to support survivors of sexual and gender-based violence and are also strengthening preparedness efforts to the upcoming cyclone and monsoon season, Dujarric said.

The Cox’s Bazar region of Bangladesh have hosted thousands of Rohingya who had fled Rakhine state before the August incident.

The Rohingya are ethnic Muslims living in the Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

Most of the refugees do not have Myanmar citizenship. (IANS)

 

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A Majority of Children Die Due to Lack of Basic Healthcare Facilities: UN

For children everywhere, the most precarious time is the first month of life

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Children
A malnourished child lies in a bed waiting to receive treatment at a therapeutic feeding center in a hospital in Sana'a, Yemen, Jan. 24, 2016. (VOA)

An estimated 6.3 million children died before their 15th birthdays in 2017, or one every five seconds, mostly due to a lack of water, sanitation, nutrition and basic healthcare, according to report by United Nations agencies on Tuesday.

The vast majority of these deaths – 5.4 million – occur in the first five years of life, with newborns accounting for around half of the deaths, the report said.

“With simple solutions like medicines, clean water, electricity and vaccines” this toll could be dramatically reduced, said Laurence Chandy, an expert with the U.N. children’s fund UNICEF. But without urgent action, 56 million children under five – half of them newborns – will die between now and 2030.

Globally, in 2017, half of all deaths in children under five were in sub-Saharan Africa, where one in 13 children died before their fifth birthday. In high-income countries, that number was one in 185, according to the report co-led by UNICEF, the World Health Organization and the World Bank.

Children
UN: A Child Dies Every Five Seconds, Most Are Preventable Deaths. Pixabay

It found that most children under five die due to preventable or treatable causes such as complications during birth, pneumonia, diarrhoea, neonatal sepsis and malaria. Among older children – aged five to 14 – injuries become a more prominent cause of death, especially from drowning and road traffic.

For children everywhere, the most precarious time is the first month of life. In 2017, 2.5 million newborns died in their first month, and a baby born in sub-Saharan Africa or in Southern Asia was nine times more likely to die in the first month than one born in a high-income country.

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Despite these problems, the U.N. report found that fewer children are dying each year worldwide. The number of under five deaths fell to 5.4 million in 2017 from 12.6 million in 1990, while the number of deaths in five to 14 year-olds dropped to under a million from 1.7 million in the same period. (VOA)

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