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UNSW to Give 61 Scholarships to Indian Students

The statement said that UNSW has been continuously looking for bright minds to deliver on the demands the future would place before the global community.

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That is the biggest challenge that higher education needs to accommodate and adjust to,
UNSW, wikimedia commons

Sydney-based University of New South Wales (UNSW) has instituted 61 scholarships to attract “bright” Indian minds and provide them financial assistance for studying in the Australian varsity.

The scholarships for the forthcoming July 2018 admissions exclusively for Indians are open to under graduate and post graduate students wishing to study at UNSW — ranked 26th in the world in employer reputation as per the QS university rankings 2017-18.

These include one full tuition fee scholarship and 10 scholarships each worth (Australian) $10,000 per annum for tuition fees.

Also, up for the grabs are 50 awards each worth $5,000 to cover tuition fee for one year that is open to post graduate students only.

Sydney-based University of New South Wales (UNSW) has instituted 61 scholarships to attract "bright" Indian minds and provide them financial assistance for studying in the Australian varsity.
Representational Image, Pixabay

A statement from the university said as part of its India strategy, the UNSW, one of the best ranked universities in the world, has been focussing on its twin pillars – strong teaching and robust research – “to dramatically disrupt the manner in which higher education is delivered”.

Australia is fast emerging as the preferred higher education destination with the job market in the country set to grow at 7.8 per cent for the next five years.

“We need to anticipate the future, especially when it is evolving at such a rapid pace. What you need is not an evolution of thinking but the revolution of thought, if we are to stay relevant. That is the biggest challenge that higher education needs to accommodate and adjust to,” said Amit Dasgupta, the India country director of UNSW.

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The statement said that UNSW has been continuously looking for bright minds to deliver on the demands the future would place before the global community.

And as such it has instituted the ‘Future of Change’ awards for students from India.

“The awards are aimed at attracting and supporting high-achieving Indian students to undertake under graduate or post graduate study at UNSW.”

To win awards, candidates need to secure admission to the Semester-2 2018 and submit a two-minute digital video testimonial of how a scholarship at UNSW will help them achieve their aspirations. The last date for applications is May 30, 2018. (IANS)

 

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Australia Becomes World’s First Country To Pass Bill Accessing Encrypted Information

Tech giant Apple said in October that “it would be wrong to weaken security for millions of law-abiding customers in order to investigate the very few who pose a threat.”

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Study Links Social Media Addicts, Substance Abusers. (VOA)

Security agencies will gain greater access to encrypted messages under new laws in Australia. The legislation will force technology companies such as Apple, Facebook and Google to disable encryption protections to allow investigators to track the communications of terrorists and other criminals. It is, however, a controversial measure.

Australian law enforcement officials say the growth of end-to-end encryption in applications such as Signal, Facebook’s WhatsApp and Apple’s iMessage hamper their efforts to track the activities of criminals and extremists.

End-to-end encryption is a code that allows a message to stay secret between the person who wrote it and the recipient.

Data Recovery, encryption
The website of the Telegram messaging app is seen on a computer’s screen in Moscow, Russia, Friday, April 13, 2018. A Russian court has ordered the blocking of a popular messaging app following a demand by authorities that it share encryption data with them. VOA

PM: Law urgently needed

But a new law passed Thursday in Australia compels technology companies, device manufacturers and service providers to build in features needed for police to crack those hitherto secret codes. However, businesses will not have to introduce these features if they are considered “systemic weaknesses,” which means they are likely to result in compromised security for other users.

The Australian legislation is the first of its kind anywhere.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the new law was urgently needed because encoded messaging apps allowed “terrorists and organized criminals and … pedophile rings to do their evil work.”

Critics: Law goes too far

However, critics, including technology companies, human rights groups, and lawyers, believe the measure goes too far and gives investigators “unprecedented powers to access encrypted communications.”

Google, Australia, encryption
A smartphone and computer screen display the Google home page. Australia is one step closer to forcing tech firms to give police access to encrypted data. VOA

Francis Galbally, the chairman of the encryption provider Senetas, says the law will send Australia’s tech sector into reverse.

“We will lose some of the greatest mathematicians and scientists this country has produced, and I can tell you because I employ a lot of them, they are fabulous, they are well regarded, but the world will now regard them if they stay in this country as subject to the government making changes to what they are doing in order to spy on everybody,” he said.

Galbally also claims that his company could lose clients to competitors overseas because it cannot guarantee its products have not been compromised by Australian authorities.

Also Read: Australia Shows Promise In Treatment of Multiple Scelrosis

Tech giant Apple said in October that “it would be wrong to weaken security for millions of law-abiding customers in order to investigate the very few who pose a threat.”

The new law includes penalties for noncompliance. (VOA)