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UNSW to Give 61 Scholarships to Indian Students

The statement said that UNSW has been continuously looking for bright minds to deliver on the demands the future would place before the global community.

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That is the biggest challenge that higher education needs to accommodate and adjust to,
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Sydney-based University of New South Wales (UNSW) has instituted 61 scholarships to attract “bright” Indian minds and provide them financial assistance for studying in the Australian varsity.

The scholarships for the forthcoming July 2018 admissions exclusively for Indians are open to under graduate and post graduate students wishing to study at UNSW — ranked 26th in the world in employer reputation as per the QS university rankings 2017-18.

These include one full tuition fee scholarship and 10 scholarships each worth (Australian) $10,000 per annum for tuition fees.

Also, up for the grabs are 50 awards each worth $5,000 to cover tuition fee for one year that is open to post graduate students only.

Sydney-based University of New South Wales (UNSW) has instituted 61 scholarships to attract "bright" Indian minds and provide them financial assistance for studying in the Australian varsity.
Representational Image, Pixabay

A statement from the university said as part of its India strategy, the UNSW, one of the best ranked universities in the world, has been focussing on its twin pillars – strong teaching and robust research – “to dramatically disrupt the manner in which higher education is delivered”.

Australia is fast emerging as the preferred higher education destination with the job market in the country set to grow at 7.8 per cent for the next five years.

“We need to anticipate the future, especially when it is evolving at such a rapid pace. What you need is not an evolution of thinking but the revolution of thought, if we are to stay relevant. That is the biggest challenge that higher education needs to accommodate and adjust to,” said Amit Dasgupta, the India country director of UNSW.

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The statement said that UNSW has been continuously looking for bright minds to deliver on the demands the future would place before the global community.

And as such it has instituted the ‘Future of Change’ awards for students from India.

“The awards are aimed at attracting and supporting high-achieving Indian students to undertake under graduate or post graduate study at UNSW.”

To win awards, candidates need to secure admission to the Semester-2 2018 and submit a two-minute digital video testimonial of how a scholarship at UNSW will help them achieve their aspirations. The last date for applications is May 30, 2018. (IANS)

 

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Australian university research holds out hope for thalassemia patients

UNSW is home to more than 52,000 students from nearly 130 countries

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There are 29 types of blood groups in reality.
There are 29 types of blood groups in reality.

Researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, have used CRISPR gene editing technology to introduce beneficial natural mutations into blood cells to boost production of foetal haemoglobin.

The method could lead to new therapies for sickle cell anaemia and other blood disorders, says the university. The research solves a 50-year-old mystery about how these mutations — which are naturally carried by a small percentage of people — operate and alter the expression of human genes.

A total of 100 men had serum levels indicative of hyponatremia. Wikimedia Commons
People with thalassemia have defective adult haemoglobin. Wikimedia Commons

The details of the study, carried out by an international team led by UNSW scientist Professor Merlin Crossley, is published in the journal Nature Genetics. Genome editing or gene editing give scientists the ability to change an organism’s DNA. These technologies allow genetic material to be added, removed or altered at particular locations in the genome.

“Our new approach can be seen as a forerunner to ‘organic gene therapy’ for a range of common inherited blood disorders including beta thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia,” said Professor Crossley, who is also UNSW Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic.

“It is organic because no new DNA is introduced into the cells. Rather, we engineer in naturally occurring, benign mutations that are known to be beneficial to people with these conditions. It should prove to be a safe and effective therapy, although more research would be needed to scale the processes up into effective treatments,” he added.

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People with thalassemia or sickle-cell anaemia have defective adult haemoglobin — the vital molecule that picks up oxygen in the lungs and transports it around the body — and require life-long treatment with blood transfusions and medications.

According to UNSW, it has engaged in a series of initiatives with the Indian government, higher education institutions, and corporations for sharing and transfer of its vast pool of tech expertise. This sets UNSW apart from host of other institutions that see India as a one-way street to train Indian students. UNSW is home to more than 52,000 students from nearly 130 countries. IANS