Friday February 21, 2020

Unused Coffee Bean Extracts can Reduce Fat-Induced Inflammation in Cells

It's been shown to be non-toxic

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Coffee Bean, Extracts, Fat
This material from coffee beans is interesting mainly because of its composition. Pixabay

Coffee is beneficial for health we all know, but unused coffee bean extracts can also help reduce fat-induced inflammation in the cells and improved glucose absorption and insulin sensitivity, find researchers.

When coffee beans are processed and roasted the husk and silverskin of the bean are removed and unused, and often are left behind in fields by coffee producers.

Food science and human nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered inflammation-fighting phenolic compounds — protocatechuic acid and gallic acid — in the silverskin and husk of coffee beans not only for their benefits in alleviating chronic disease but also in adding value to would-be ‘waste’ products from the coffee processing industry.

“This material from coffee beans is interesting mainly because of its composition. It’s been shown to be non-toxic. And these phenolics have a very high anti-oxidant capacity,” said Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, Professor of food science and co-author of the study published in Food and Chemical Toxicology.

Coffee Bean, Extracts, Fat
When coffee beans are processed and roasted the husk and silverskin of the bean are removed and unused, and often are left behind in fields by coffee producers. Pixabay

When fat cells of mice were treated with water-based extracts from coffee beans skins, the phenolic compounds reduced fat-induced inflammation in the cells and improved glucose absorption and insulin sensitivity.

The findings show promise for these bioactive compounds, when consumed as part of the diet, as a strategy for preventing obesity-related chronic illnesses, such as Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

For the study, the fat cells and immune cells were cultured together to recreate the ‘real-life’ interaction between the two cells.

When obesity-related inflammation is present, the fat cells and immune cells work together — stuck in a loop–to increase oxidative stress and interfere with glucose uptake, worsening the situation.

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In order to block this loop and prevent chronic disease, the researchers’ goals are to eliminate or reduce as much inflammation as possible in order to allow glucose uptake to be facilitated, as well as to have healthy cells that will produce adequate insulin.

The researchers also stressed the positive impact on the environment of using the coffee bean by-products.

During coffee processing, the bean is separated from the husk, the external outer layer of the bean. After the bean is roasted, the silverskin layer is separated.

“It’s a huge environmental problem because when they separate this husk after processing, it usually stays in the field fermenting, growing mold, and causing problems,” explained de Mejia.

Coffee Bean, Extracts, Fat
Food science and human nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered inflammation-fighting phenolic compounds — protocatechuic acid and gallic acid — in the silverskin and husk of coffee beans not only for their benefits. Pixabay

Worldwide, 1,160,000 tonnes of husk are left in fields per year, potentially causing contamination.

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Additionally, 43,000 tonnes of silverskin is produced each year, which, de Mejia adds, may be easier to utilize because it stays with the bean as it is exported to different countries to be roasted. (IANS)

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Here’s why Children Should Avoid Consuming Fast Food

Eating fast food can make kids fat

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fast food
Researchers have found that fast food intake can independently contribute to excess weight gain among children. Pixabay

If you want your children to stay in shape, do not allow them to indulge in burgers and pizzas. Health and lifestyle researchers have found that fast food intake can independently contribute to excess weight gain among children.

Being overweight and obese increases the risk of numerous physical and psychosocial problems during childhood, including fatty liver disease, Type-2 diabetes and depression.

“We now know from our studies and others, that kids who start on the path of extra weight gain during this really important time frame tend to carry it forward into adolescence and adulthood, and this sets them up for major health consequences as they get older,” said first author Jennifer Emond, Assistant Professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, US.

“To our knowledge, ours is the first study to follow a cohort over time and to show that fast food, by itself, uniquely contributes to weight gain,” explained Emond.

Previous research has shown that fast food intake is common among children and has suggested that there is an association between fast food consumption and children becoming overweight or obese.

fast food
Findings from this research should be used to inform guidelines and policies that can reduce fast food marketing exposure to children and help support parents who may be struggling to adopt healthier eating behaviours for their kids. Pixabay

But it has not been clear whether eating fast food independently contributes to excess weight gain at such a young age.

In an effort to make this determination, the investigators followed a cohort of more than 500 pre-school age children (ages 3 to 5) and their families in southern New Hampshire for one year.

The height and weight of the children were measured at the beginning and end of the study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

Parents reported their children’s fast food intake frequency weekly – from 11 chain fast food restaurants – in six online surveys that were completed at two-month intervals.

The researchers found that at the beginning of the study, about 18 per cent of the children were overweight and nearly 10 per cent were obese.

Importantly, about 8 per cent of the children transitioned to a greater weight status over the one-year period.

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“Unlike with past research, we were able to adjust for other factors – such as exercise and screen time – that could possibly explain away this relationship,” Emond said.

“Findings from this research should be used to inform guidelines and policies that can reduce fast food marketing exposure to children and help support parents who may be struggling to adopt healthier eating behaviours for their kids,” she added. (IANS)