Wednesday December 19, 2018
Home India Indian-Americ...

Indian-Americans Role in US Government is “profound”, have Contributed Immensely to Art and Culture, says US lawmaker

Congressman David Schweikert has praised Indian-Americans for their contribution in enriching art and culture in USA

0
//
David Schweikert praises Indian-Americans.
David Schweikert praises Indian-Americans. Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint
  • US lawmaker David Schweikert has praised Indian community for its contribution to the nation
  • The statement was made ahead of PM Narendra Modi’s meet with Indian Diaspora in the city
  • Many Indian-Americans have secured influential positions in US government

Washington, June 25, 2017: US lawmaker and Congressman David Schweikert has said that Indian-Americans have contributed immensely to art and culture in the USA and that their role in US government is “profound”. This was said by the top lawmaker ahead of PM Narendra Modi’s interaction with Indian Diaspora in the area as a part of his 3-day tour of USA.

“There is much to celebrate in our country’s relationship with India, the world’s largest democracy, and in the enormous contributions that Indian-Americans make in our country. The role of Indian-Americans in government is profound.”, said Schweikert.

There are about four million Indian-Americans in the USA, stated the reports of the Census Bureau.

The Congressional Research Service has further stated that the annual bilateral trade between the two nations is expected to reach USD 500 billion by 2024, a five-fold increase since 2013, adding a further significance to India-US relations.

ALSO READ: Can Flourishing Islamic State (ISIS) be Stopped in Afghanistan?

Schweikert said in the House of Representatives, “In 2010 Pew Research Centre, a non-partisan think tank, reported that more than 87 percent of adult Indian-Americans were foreign-born and they were highly educated and successful.” He further praised the community by giving several narrations of the community’s success in the country.

In the recent past, many Indian-Americans secured influential posts in the US government. Nikki Haley who was earlier the Governor of South Carolina, was appointed the ambassador to the UN.  Seema Verma was named administrator of the Centre for Medicaid and Medicare Services.

Ajit Pai was made the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Four Indian Americans took their seats in the House of Representatives and one in the Senate; and many more serve in state legislatures, local governments, the judicial branch and beyond.

The Congressman further stated, “Indian-Americans have deeply enriched our nation’s arts and culture, and the Indian media in the US is surging to meet demand. Cable, satellite and radio offer a growing array of Hindu and Indian content. Politically and militarily, our two countries are united in a commitment to fight terrorism and promote world peace.”

– prepared by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram. Twitter: @NikitaTayal6 

 

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Issues Over Heritage In Illinois Election Campaign

"We vote by the type of person and what that person can do and not by anything else"

0
Midterm Elections, illinois
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Urbana, Illinois. VOA

In an Illinois congressional district where just six percent of the constituency is Indian American, the incumbent Democrat Congressman is being challenged by another Indian American.

“I see it as American versus American,” Jitendra Diganvker, or “JD” — the Republican challenger for the Illinois 8th district, said.

“Yeah we happen to be Indian,” he added dismissively.

“It is a good thing that members of minorities are running as Democrats or as Republicans,” the incumbent Raja Krishnamoorthi said.

The Illinois 8th District is 51 percent Caucasian, 28 percent Hispanic,14 percent Asian, and four percent African-American, according to the most recent U.S. Census data. Of those Asians, about half are Indian, according to the campaigns’ estimates.

Views and policy

In this diverse district, voters care about issues more than identity.

“I don’t care about them being Indian American. I just hope that whichever one wins that they support and help the people,” said Michelle Sims, an employee at the DuPage Community College. “And if you’re Indian then, hey, that’s fine. Just help the people.”

A Jamaican-American university student, Amara Creighton, says she thinks it is great that two minority candidates are running and have support, regardless of their ethnicity.

“I think what’s more important is their views and their policies,” Creighton said. “I mean, it doesn’t really matter to me what their minority is as long as they’re standing up for us and doing good for us.”

This rare instance of two candidates of the same minority running against each other is reflective of a larger trend throughout the United States – record numbers of Indian Americans are running for office and winning their elections.

In 2016, four Indian Americans — one of them being Krishnamoorthi, were elected to the U.S. House and a fifth was elected to the Senate — outnumbering in just one election the total number of Indian Americans to serve as U.S. representatives.

illinois
Incumbent Raja Krishnamoorthi goes by his first name, which his constituents can more easily pronounce. VOA

Krishnamoorthi, a businessman and former deputy state treasurer, was elected to his first term in the House of Representatives in 2016. He succeeded Democrat Tammy Duckworth, who was elected that year to the U.S. Senate.

Diganvker is a small businessman, Uber driver, and ardent member of the local Republican party. As the underdog, he is running as a “day-to-day” guy, and says he decided to run because he feels his opponent is out of touch with middle-class, hardworking families in his community.

But his opponent, who is completing his first term in Congress, says he is far from out of touch with his community. He visits each weekend to see his wife and children when Congress is in session.

Though both candidates are immigrants, their views on immigration policy differ. Krishnamoorthi, the Democrat, has been critical of Trump’s policies to decrease refugee allowances and speaks out against family separations at the border.

“We shouldn’t separate parents from children,” he told VOA. “That’s an abomination.”

Though Diganvker, too, opposes family separations at the border, he favors Trump’s promise to build a wall along the border with Mexico and supported the travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries.

illinois
Republican challenger Jitendra “JD” Digavnker says he is running as a “day-to-day” guy. VOA

“I’m also an immigrant. I followed the legal process and I believe in merit-based immigration,” he said, adding that merit-based immigration “brings the right skill set of people into our country.”

Krishnamoorthi, however, said that his parents legal immigration to the United States has not hardened his immigration stance.

“The fact that my parents came here legally and someone [else] did not, doesn’t mean that we should be inhumane or disrespectful, doesn’t mean we should treat them with anything less than dignity,” he said.

Diverse constituency

Both Congressional candidates are Hindu, but have wooed members of various religions in the community.

“When you come to this country there is no race,” said Farrukh Khan, a Muslim halal-shop owner in Schaumburg. “We should not go for the race, we should go for the people who more care about you and your community. Hindu or Muslim doesn’t matter.”

illinois
Halal shop-owner Farrukh Khan says that he is unconsidered by the religion of either candidate. VOA

So as not to lose a customer, he did not indicate which man he will support in the November election.

Myrna Frankel has volunteered for Krishnamoorthi since his first campaign, an unsuccessful bid for Illinois comptroller in 2010. They know each other through the Jewish Beth Tikvah Congregation in Schaumburg where the congressman, who lives a few blocks away, sent his children for nursery school.

“He considers himself a JewDu – half Jewish, half Hindu,” she recounted with a laugh.

Myrna’s husband, Robert, said that this diversity and community relationships are typical of their community.

“Our state senator is from Mexico. Our state representative is from Puerto Rico. Our junior senator is of Thai background,” he said.

“We vote by the type of person and what that person can do and not by anything else,” he said.

Also Read: Democrats Gain Fundraising Advantage In The US Midterm Elections

When it comes to policy, voters in the Illinois 8th seem to heavily favor the incumbent. Early polling by Five Thirty Eight shows a “99% chance” that Krishnamoorthi will win. Rasmussen’s most recent poll shows a “Strong Dem” leaning in the midterm. As of June 30, Krishnamoorthi had raised more than $4 million compared to Diganvker’s $29,000.

But the challenger isn’t intimidated.

“People can give him $10 million and that’s not going to scare me,” he said, adding that despite recent polling, his campaign is “1,000 percent sure” that he will win in November. (VOa)