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US Planning For Space Force To Stay Ahead in War

The general says his team is already writing government proposals to make space resupply a certainty for future military mobility

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Space Force
Air Force Gen. Carlton D. Everhart, the Commander of Air Mobility Command, left, holds a binder with a photograph of Air Force One on the cover as he speaks to Navy Adm. Bill Moran, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, second from left, while arriving with other generals and admirals for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Fla., Dec. 21, 2016. (VOA)
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It might sound like science fiction, but the general in charge of the U.S. military’s air transports across the globe says refueling and resupplying the military may soon be a job that’s literally out of this world.

“If I can resupply from space I can go across globe in about 30 minutes,” Air Force General Carlton Everhart, the head of Air Mobility Command, told VOA. “I do truly believe that is the next step. We can really make inroads.”

Everhart says the time gained by using hypersonic craft in space could keep him ahead in “the speed of war,” where competitors China and Russia have been trying to make gains.

The idea of using space deliveries isn’t as far out as it may seem. In fact, industry leaders, companies Everhart hopes to partner with, are already working on this type of technology.

Launch vehicles from companies like SpaceX, Sierra Nevada, and even foreign ventures could “provide tremendous strategic advantage to the U.S. government,” according to Eric Stallmer, the president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation.

But it’s an advantage that would come with an astronomical price tag of thousands of dollars per kilo.

Experts say the need to transport via space must outweigh these costs, perhaps only being used during the most important of missions.

Todd Harrison, a space and defense expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, points to the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, which killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, as a situation where time necessities could overpower cost concerns.

“Imagine if we had been able to launch a SEAL team and put them right down in that compound within 45 minutes of knowing that it was under attack. It could have made the difference,” he said.

The general is not just focused on launching from one point on Earth to another, Everhart also wants to use satellites to preposition cargo in space.

Stallmer said a lot of spaceflight companies are looking at this idea of space refueling depots, including plans to convert those refueling vehicles to habitats within space once they’ve been used.

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The future is full of possibilities, but it is unclear when these technologies will be fully developed. Experts give estimates ranging from a couple of years to more than a decade, but that doesn’t stop Everhart from dreaming.

“The train is leaving the station and we’re going to be on it. And I’m not going to be on the caboose. I want to be in front of, I’m going to be in the front,” he said.

The general says his team is already writing government proposals to make space resupply a certainty for future military mobility. (VOA)

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Apple Moves up in The List of Top-Rated Employers

Facebook investors have increased pressure on Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg to step down after a New York Times investigation suggested that the social network hired a Republican-owned political consulting and PR firm that "dug up dirt on its competitors"

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Apple
Facebook no longer best place to work in US, Apple gains ground.

Hit by users’ data scandals amid falling stocks this year, Facebook has lost the tag of best place to work in the US while Apple has moved up in the list of top-rated employers.

According to the leading job website Glassdoor’s annual “100 Best Places to Work in the US” list that came out on Wednesday, Boston-based management consulting firm Bain & Co. has been ranked No 1.

Facebook is now ranked No 7 — scoring 4.5 out of a perfect 5.

Apple moved up from No 84 to 71 with a score of 4.3. Microsoft moved up from No 39 to 34 as its score dropped from 4.4 to 4.3.

Microsoft-owned LinkedIn, however, is at sixth place with a score of 4.5, read the information on the Glassdoor website.

While Facebook was the best place to work in America last year, Cupertino-based tech giant Apple had tumbled to number 84 in 2017 from its 36th position in 2016.

Amazon didn’t even make it to the list, with an award score of 4.1, just outside of the top 100.

Apple, on the other hand, moved up in the ranking, from No. 84 to 71, though it maintained the same score of 4.3. Microsoft moved up in ranking from No. 39 to 34 on the list although their award score dropped from 4.4 to 4.3. Google was 8th while Salesforce came 11th.

Facebook
Facebook, social media. Pixabay

The Top-100 list by Glassdoor is for large organisations or those with at least 1,000 employees.

The Glassdoor list came at a time when media reports said several Facebook employees are looking for better opportunities as scrutiny of the company’s conduct rises following several cases of data leak and as its stock price take a beating.

According to a CNBC report earlier this week, Facebook employees are contacting former colleagues to look for jobs outside the company.

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal last month citing an internal survey at Facebook, just over half of Facebook employees (52 per cent) said they were optimistic about the future of the social networking platform — down by 32 per cent last year.

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Only 53 per cent of Facebook employees said the company was making the world better, which is 19 per cent lower than last year.

According to the report, Facebook’s “difficult year is taking a toll on employee morale, with several key measures of internal sentiment taking a sharp turn for the worse over the past year”.

Facebook investors have increased pressure on Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg to step down after a New York Times investigation suggested that the social network hired a Republican-owned political consulting and PR firm that “dug up dirt on its competitors”.

Zuckerberg, however, has refused to quit. (IANS)