Saturday April 20, 2019
Home Politics US President ...

US President Donald Trump’s travel ban inflicts “Significant harm” on Muslim Americans

Over a dozen groups representing the Muslim community filed a legal brief before the Court of Appeals for the dismissal of Trump's "unconstitutional" orders

0
//

Washington, Feb 7, 2017: “Significant harm” is inflicted on Muslim Americans by US President Donald Trump’s travel ban on nationals from seven Muslim-majority countries, over half a dozen groups representing the community have told a court, urging it to cancel the “unconstitutional” order.

According to the legal brief filed by the groups before US 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, “The Executive Order is an unconstitutional infringement upon the rights of Muslims. It inflicts significant harm on the American Muslim community and American Muslim professionals.”

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

“It threatens American Muslims’ ability to practice their professions in the United States; it threatens American Muslims who live, work, travel and have families abroad; and it subjects Muslims to a damaging stigma,” collective legal filing added.

Muslim Advocates, American Muslim Health Professionals, Council for the Advancement of Muslim Professionals, Islamic Medical Association of North America, Muslim Urban Professionals, National Arab American Medical Association and Network of Arab-American Professionals are prominent among the groups.

The organisations urged the Court to reject the Government’s Motion for extraordinary interlocutory relief and said Muslim Americans were going through an additional injury as a result of the stigma that has attached to the community in an unfair and irrational way.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today

 “The intentional and false stigmatisation of Muslims as potential terrorists—even if supposedly limited to Muslims from the 7 majority-Muslim countries expressly included in the Executive Order — will, if not restrained, continue to irreparably harm Amici,” it mentioned.

Contrary to the misconception propagated by the “Muslim ban”, the presence of Muslims in America is not a threat to American security. Studies have proven Muslims have been a part of America since the founding of the nation, when 10—15 per cent of slaves forcibly brought to America were Muslim, the filing pointed out.

“Muslims have expended their blood, sweat, and tears building and defending the United States,” it informed, adding that more than 5,000 Muslims are associated with the US military services, and many have sacrificed their lives in battlefields to defend American interests.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

“They also provide necessary healthcare, educate our nation’s children, create jobs, and contribute innovation that is an essential driver of our nation’s economic growth. Today, Muslims represent one per cent of the US population,” the legal brief concluded.

 prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang

 

Next Story

U.S. President Donald Trump Vetoes Measure to End U..S Involvement in Yemen War

ump issued his first veto last month on legislation related to immigration. Trump had declared a national emergency so he could use more money to construct a border wall. Congress voted to block the emergency declaration and Trump vetoed that measure.

0
Yemen
Men inspect the site of an airstrike by Saudi-led coalition in Sanaa, Yemen, April 10, 2019. VOA

President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end U.S. military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen.

In a break with the president, Congress voted for the first time earlier this month to invoke the War Powers Resolution to try to stop U.S. involvement in a foreign conflict.

The veto — the second in Trump’s presidency — was expected. Congress lacks the votes to override him.

“This resolution is an unnecessary, dangerous attempt to weaken my constitutional authorities, endangering the lives of American citizens and brave service members, both today and in the future,” Trump wrote in explaining his veto.

Congress has grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia as he tries to further isolate Iran, a regional rival.

Many lawmakers also criticized the president for not condemning Saudi Arabia for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States and had written critically about the kingdom. Khashoggi went into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last October and never came out. Intelligence agencies said Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was complicit in the killing.

U.S.
Congress has grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia as he tries to further isolate Iran, a regional rival. VOA

The U.S. provides billions of dollars of arms to the Saudi-led coalition fighting against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen. Members of Congress have expressed concern about the thousands of civilians killed in coalition airstrikes since the conflict began in 2014. The fighting in the Arab world’s poorest country also has left millions suffering from food and medical care shortages and has pushed the country to the brink of famine.

House approval of the resolution came earlier this month on a 247-175 vote. The Senate vote last month was 54-46.

Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel of New York, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, voted to end U.S. military assistance to the war, saying the humanitarian crisis in Yemen triggered “demands moral leadership.”

Donald Trump
President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end U.S. military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen. VOA

The top Republican on the committee, Rep. Michael McCaul of Texas, acknowledged the dire situation in Yemen for civilians, but spoke out in opposition to the bill. McCaul said it was an abuse of the War Powers Resolution and predicted it could disrupt U.S. security cooperation agreements with more than 100 countries.

Also Read: Despite Tariff War With U.S, China’s Economic Growth is Steady

Trump issued his first veto last month on legislation related to immigration. Trump had declared a national emergency so he could use more money to construct a border wall. Congress voted to block the emergency declaration and Trump vetoed that measure. (VOA)