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US Acknowledges SE Asia Countries not Heeding Warnings about Security Risks of Choosing Huawei for 5G

Thai authorities indicated that the affordability of Huawei's 5G services offset potential concerns over cybersecurity

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FILE - A receptionist stands at the front counter of the Huawei's Cyber Security Lab at the Huawei factory in Dongguan, China's Guangdong province, March 6, 2019. VOA

Xu Ning from VOA Mandarin and reporter Rob Garver contributed to this report.

The United States is acknowledging that many countries are not heeding warnings about the possible security risks in allowing Chinese tech giant Huawei to build the next generation of high-speech wireless networks known as 5G.

The trend is particularly clear in Southeast Asia, where even U.S. allies are racing ahead to partner with Huawei and launch 5G networks in the coming years.

In February, Thailand launched a Huawei 5G test network in Chonburi. Thai authorities indicated that the affordability of Huawei’s 5G services offset potential concerns over cybersecurity.

In the Philippines, its Globe Telecom is rolling out the nation’s 5G network in partnership with Huawei.

In Malaysia, the country’s leading communications and digital services company Maxis signed a memorandum of understanding with Huawei to cooperate and accelerate 5G development.

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FILE – Visitors look at a display for 5G wireless technology from Chinese technology firm Huawei at the PT Expo in Beijing, China, Sept. 26, 2018. VOA

This week, six former top U.S. military officials, including two who were commanders for the U.S. Pacific Command, issued a blunt warning of a future where a Chinese-developed 5G network could be widely adopted among American allies.

“There is reason for concern that in the future the U.S. will not be able to use networks that rely on Chinese technology for military operations in the territories of traditional U.S. allies or emerging partners in Europe, Asia and beyond,” said the former military leaders in a statement.

“The immense bandwidth and access potential inherent in commercial 5G systems means effective military operations in the future could benefit from military data being pushed over these networks,” they added.

And U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday warned some European countries could soon find themselves cut off from U.S. intelligence and other critical information if they continue to cultivate relationships with Chinese technology firms.

“We’ve done our risk analysis,” Pompeo said, following a NATO ministerial meeting in Washington. “We have now shared that with our NATO partners, with countries all around the world. We’ve made clear that if the risk exceeds the threshold for the United States, we simply won’t be able to share that information any longer.”

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FILE – The logos of Huawei are displayed at it retail shop window reflecting the Ministry of Foreign Affairs office in Beijing, Jan. 29, 2019. VOA

“Huawei is not a state-owned enterprise. But Huawei is a Chinese company and what we do know is several things. One, broadly speaking, Chinese companies will respond to requests for demands from the Chinese government. Telecommunications is a vital part of national backbones. It has military security implications. It has financial and economic implications,” said Dean Cheng, a senior research fellow of Washington-based Heritage Foundation.

Cheap. Fast. Secure?

Huawei insists that it would not turn information over to Chinese authorities if they demanded it, but few outside analysts believe any Chinese company would stand up the country’s authoritarian government. U.S. officials are even more direct.

“What we do is in our national interests, we see with companies like Huawei that are supported, if not directed, by central authorities in China. We see challenges and potential threats to the sanctity, the security of our systems in our networks, and the best we can do with our friends and partners and allies, is to share our information, share our experience,” Patrick Murphy, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, told VOA at a recent seminar at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

That message clearly has had a mixed reception, especially after years when the United States’ vast electronic eavesdropping capabilities have drawn criticism.

Richard Kramer, founder of Arete, a technology research firm based in London, said leaks from U.S. security agencies in recent years have revealed close cooperation between the federal government and U.S. telecoms and tech firms around intelligence gathering. The U.S. position, he said, seems to be: “We don’t want China to spy on us, but we want to be able to spy on them.”

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FILE – Attendees wait in line for a 5G exhibition at the Qualcomm booth during CES 2019 consumer electronics show, at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Jan. 10, 2019. VOA

Will pressure backfire?

Even in countries where there are open political concerns over the growing power of Chinese influence, too much U.S. pressure could backfire, said Anthony Nelson, Director of the East Asia and Pacific practice at the Albright Stonebridge Group, a global business strategy firm.

“Southeast Asian countries that are looking to balance their military relationships with the U.S. and China are not motivated by Washington’s security concerns, with the notable exception of Vietnam,” Nelson said.

ALSO READ: US Multi-Pronged Efforts to Persuade European Allies to Stay Away from Huawei 5G Tech Could Backfire

Vietnam has had tensions with China in recent years over disputed territory and trade issues. Vietnamese Ambassador to the U.S., Ha Kim Ngoc, told VOA that all companies operating in the country need to respect Vietnam’s sovereignty.

“We have one principle: They need to respect our sovereignty, national sovereignty,” said the ambassador at the recent USIP event. (VOA)

Next Story

Huawei Releases Atlas 900, World’s Fastest Artificial Intelligence (AI) Training Cluster

We will keep investing with a strategy that focuses on four key areas

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Huawei, Atlas 900, World
The future of computing is a massive market worth more than two trillion US dollars. Pixabay

Chinese tech giant Huawei on Wednesday released Atlas 900, the world’s fastest Artificial Intelligence (AI) training cluster which would help to make technology more readily available for different fields of scientific research and business innovation.

“The future of computing is a massive market worth more than two trillion US dollars. We will keep investing with a strategy that focuses on four key areas. We will push the boundaries of architecture, invest in processors for all scenarios, keep clear business boundaries, and build an open ecosystem,” said Ken Hu, Huawei’s Deputy Chairman.

Atlas 900 combines the power of thousands of Ascend processors. It takes Atlas 900 only 59.8 seconds to train ResNet-50, the gold standard for measuring AI training performance. This is 10 seconds faster than the previous world record, the company said in a statement.

Huawei also deployed Atlas 900 on Huawei Cloud as a cluster service, making extraordinary computing power more broadly accessible to its customers across different industries.

Huawei, Atlas 900, World
Chinese tech giant Huawei on Wednesday released Atlas 900, the world’s fastest Artificial Intelligence (AI) training cluster which would help to make technology more readily available. Pixabay

The company has offered these services at a great discount to universities and scientific research institutes worldwide.

Huawei estimates that in the next five years, statistical computing will become the mainstream and AI computing will account for more than 80 per cent of all computing power used around the world.

In addition, the company announced its flagship Kirin 990 System on Chip (SoC) will be available in India soon.

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The Kirin 990, which is also the world’s first 5G-integrated mobile chipset, is also the first mobile SoC to come with 10.3 billion transistors, thus making it incredibly fast and efficient. (IANS)