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Users divided for twitter on its increase in character limit

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Twitter is a social micro-blogging site. Wikimedia Commons
Twitter is a social micro-blogging site. Wikimedia Commons
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San Francisco, Dec 28, 2017: A month after Twitter doubled its 140-character restriction for people to express more in a tweet, users were divided on the new 280-character limit with only 38 per cent approving the change, a new survey has found.

According to the survey by London-based market research company YouGov, four in 10 said they liked it more now that tweets could be 280 characters long, while around a third (32 per cent) said they preferred it when tweets could only be 140 characters long.

The remaining 30 per cent were undecided on the change.

The 140-character limit was around since 2006 and became part of Twitter’s personality. The new 280-character limit was made available virtually for all users — including for those who tweet in Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi and Tamil.

In September, Twitter launched a test with a select group of users that expanded the 140-character limit.

“Our goal was to make this possible while ensuring we keep the speed and brevity that makes Twitter, Twitter,” the micro-blogging website had said at that time.

During the first few days of the test, many people tweeted the full 280-limit because it was new and novel but soon after, the behaviour normalised.

Only five per cent of tweets sent were longer than 140 characters and only two per cent were over 190 characters, Twitter had found.

YouGov also found similar trend. About half (45 per cent) preferred 140 character Twitter, while 42 per cent like 280 character Twitter more (13 per cent did not have an opinion). (IANS)

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Social Media Laws Should Be Tightened: Germany

Facebook in July said it had deleted hundreds of offensive posts since implementation of the law

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An illustration picture shows a man starting his Twitter app on a mobile device in Hanau near Frankfurt. VOA

German states have drafted a list of demands aimed at tightening a law that requires social media companies like Facebook and Twitter to remove hate speech from their sites, the Handelblatt newspaper reported Monday.

Justice ministers from the states will submit their proposed revisions to the German law called NetzDG at a meeting with Justice Minister Katarina Barley on Thursday, the newspaper said, saying it had obtained a draft of the document.

The law, which came into full force on Jan. 1, is a highly ambitious effort to control what appears on social media and it has drawn a range of criticism.

Twitter, tweets, social media
Twitter allows publishers to monetise video views globally. (VOA)

While the German states are focused on concerns about how complaints are processed, other officials have called for changes following criticism that too much content was being blocked.

The states’ justice ministers are calling for changes that would make it easier for people who want to complain about banned content such as pro-Nazi ideology to find the required forms on social media platforms.

They also want to fine social media companies up to 500,000 euros ($560,950) for providing “meaningless replies” to queries from law enforcement authorities, the newspaper said.

Till Steffen, the top justice official in Hamburg and a member of the Greens party, told the newspaper that the law had in some cases proven to be “a paper tiger.”

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If we want to effectively limit hate and incitement on the internet, we have to give the law more bite. Pixabay

“If we want to effectively limit hate and incitement on the internet, we have to give the law more bite and close the loopholes,” he told the paper. “For instance, it cannot be the case that some platforms hide their complaint forms so that no one can find them.”

Also Read: Facebook Allows French Regulators to Oversee Hate Speech Control

Facebook in July said it had deleted hundreds of offensive posts since implementation of the law, which foresees fines of up to 50 million euros ($56.10 million) for failure to comply. (VOA)