Saturday December 7, 2019

Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke

Regular sauna baths cut risk of stroke

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Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke.
Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke. Pixabay

Staying healthy need not make you always follow a tough regime of restrictions as a new study shows that frequent sauna bathing may significantly reduce the risk of stroke.

In the 15-year follow-up study, published in the journal Neurology, the researchers found that people taking a sauna four to seven times a week were 61 per cent less likely to suffer a stroke than those taking a sauna once a week.

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, placing a heavy human and economic burden on societies.

According to the researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, mechanisms driving the association of sauna bathing with reduced stroke may include a reduction in blood pressure, stimulation of immune system, a positive impact on the autonomic nervous system, and an improved cardiovascular function.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The study involved 1,628 men and women aged 53 to 74 years living in the eastern part of Finland.

Based on their frequency of taking traditional Finnish sauna baths (relative humidity 10-20 per cent), the study participants were divided into three groups – those taking a sauna once a week, those taking a sauna two or tree times a week, and those taking a sauna four to seven times a week.

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The more frequently saunas were taken, the lower was the risk of stroke, the results showed.

Compared to people taking one sauna session per week, the risk was decreased by 14 per cent among those with two to three sessions and 61 per cent among those with four to seven sessions.

Previous studies had shown that frequent sauna bathing also significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.  (IANS)

Next Story

Cancer Patients Are More Prone To Death From A Stroke: Study

One explanation for the increased risk could be that many people who are diagnosed with cancer are in a 'prothrombotic' state, which means they are more likely to form a blood clot

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Stroke
Additionally, they found that among those diagnosed with Cancer before they turned 40, most Stroke occurred in people treated for brain tumors and lymphomas. Pixabay

People living with Cancer are more than twice as likely to die of a stroke, compared to the general population say researchers, adding that the risk increases with time.

Cancers of the breast, prostate or colorectum were the type most commonly associated with fatal stroke, said the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

According the researchers, previous research has shown that most cancer patients aren’t going to die of their cancer, they are going to die of something else.

“A stroke is one possibility. Our findings suggest that patients may benefit from a screening program to help prevent some of these early deaths from stroke, as well as help identify which patients we could target with those preventative efforts,” said study researcher Nicholas Zaorsky, Assistant Professor at Penn State University in the US.

For the findings, the researchers used data gathered from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) programme.

SEER includes data about cancer incidence, survival, treatment and age and year of diagnosis, and covers 28 per cent of the US population.

They used SEER data on more than 7.2 million patients who had been diagnosed with invasive cancer — cancer that has spread beyond the tissue in which it originally developed — between 1992 and 2015.

The researchers found that out of 7,529,481 cancer patients, 80,513 died of a stroke.

Males and females had equal chances of dying from a stroke, but those diagnosed with cancer at a younger age had a higher chance of a fatal stroke.

Stroke
People living with Cancer are more than twice as likely to die of a Stroke, compared to the general population say researchers, adding that the risk increases with time. Pixabay

Additionally, they found that among those diagnosed with cancer before they turned 40, most strokes occurred in people treated for brain tumors and lymphomas.

In patients diagnosed with cancer above the age of 40, fatal strokes were most commonly associated with cancer of the prostate, breast and colorectum.

One explanation for the increased risk could be that many people who are diagnosed with cancer are in a ‘prothrombotic’ state, which means they are more likely to form a blood clot, Zaorsky said.

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“That blood clot may then go to the lungs and cause a pulmonary embolism, for example, or cause a stroke if it goes to the brain,” Zaorsky added.

The researchers added that future studies could help pinpoint mechanisms and further establish the relationship between cancer and strokes. (IANS)