Sunday September 23, 2018

Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke

Regular sauna baths cut risk of stroke

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Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke.
Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke. Pixabay
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Staying healthy need not make you always follow a tough regime of restrictions as a new study shows that frequent sauna bathing may significantly reduce the risk of stroke.

In the 15-year follow-up study, published in the journal Neurology, the researchers found that people taking a sauna four to seven times a week were 61 per cent less likely to suffer a stroke than those taking a sauna once a week.

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, placing a heavy human and economic burden on societies.

According to the researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, mechanisms driving the association of sauna bathing with reduced stroke may include a reduction in blood pressure, stimulation of immune system, a positive impact on the autonomic nervous system, and an improved cardiovascular function.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The study involved 1,628 men and women aged 53 to 74 years living in the eastern part of Finland.

Based on their frequency of taking traditional Finnish sauna baths (relative humidity 10-20 per cent), the study participants were divided into three groups – those taking a sauna once a week, those taking a sauna two or tree times a week, and those taking a sauna four to seven times a week.

Also Read: New mobile application can reduce stroke risk

The more frequently saunas were taken, the lower was the risk of stroke, the results showed.

Compared to people taking one sauna session per week, the risk was decreased by 14 per cent among those with two to three sessions and 61 per cent among those with four to seven sessions.

Previous studies had shown that frequent sauna bathing also significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.  (IANS)

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Scientists Develop Potential Approach to Treat Dementia, Stroke

"It also shows that these changes may be reversible, paving the way for potential treatments," Williams added

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The article provides information on the topic "Scientists Develop Potential Approach to Treat Dementia, Stroke". (IANS)

Stopping blood vessel cells from becoming dysfunctional may reverse the symptoms of small vessel disease (SVD) — major cause of dementia and stroke — and prevent brain damage in older adults, scientists have found.

The study, led by the University of Edinburgh, found that SVD occurs when cells that line the small blood vessels in the brain become dysfunctional causing them to secrete a molecule into the brain.

The molecule stops production of the protective layer that surrounds brain cells — called myelin — leading to brain damage.

“This important research helps us understand why small vessel disease happens, providing a direct link between small blood vessels and changes in the brain that are linked to dementia,” said Anna Williams from University of Edinburgh’s MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Scotland.

“It also shows that these changes may be reversible, paving the way for potential treatments,” Williams added.

1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay
1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay

In the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team used rat model and found that treating them with drugs that can reverse changes in blood vessels in the brain associated with cerebral small vessel disease.

“The findings highlight a promising direction for research into treatments that could limit the damaging effects of blood vessel changes and help keep nerve cells functioning for longer,” said Sara Imarisio, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Research in Britain.

Also Read: Sleep Disorder Linked with Brain Changes Found in Dementia

However, further studies are needed to test whether the treatment also works when the disease is firmly established, researchers said.

Dementia is one of the biggest problems facing society, as people live longer and the population ages.

Estimates indicate there are almost 47 million people living with dementia worldwide and the numbers affected are expected to double every 20 years, rising to more than 115 million by 2050. (IANS)

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