Sunday August 25, 2019

Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke

Regular sauna baths cut risk of stroke

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Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke.
Using a Sauna May Reduce the Risk of Stroke. Pixabay

Staying healthy need not make you always follow a tough regime of restrictions as a new study shows that frequent sauna bathing may significantly reduce the risk of stroke.

In the 15-year follow-up study, published in the journal Neurology, the researchers found that people taking a sauna four to seven times a week were 61 per cent less likely to suffer a stroke than those taking a sauna once a week.

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, placing a heavy human and economic burden on societies.

According to the researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, mechanisms driving the association of sauna bathing with reduced stroke may include a reduction in blood pressure, stimulation of immune system, a positive impact on the autonomic nervous system, and an improved cardiovascular function.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The study involved 1,628 men and women aged 53 to 74 years living in the eastern part of Finland.

Based on their frequency of taking traditional Finnish sauna baths (relative humidity 10-20 per cent), the study participants were divided into three groups – those taking a sauna once a week, those taking a sauna two or tree times a week, and those taking a sauna four to seven times a week.

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The more frequently saunas were taken, the lower was the risk of stroke, the results showed.

Compared to people taking one sauna session per week, the risk was decreased by 14 per cent among those with two to three sessions and 61 per cent among those with four to seven sessions.

Previous studies had shown that frequent sauna bathing also significantly reduces the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.  (IANS)

Next Story

Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

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obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

obesity
Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

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The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)