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Uttar Pradesh Government to Conserve Trees that Are More than 100 Years Old

After their identification, a display board will be put up near each tree giving details about its age, species and how it is beneficial

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Uttar Pradesh, Conserve, Trees
The Principal Chief Conservator of forests (PCCF) Pawan Kumar recently directed the state's Forest Department to collaborate with gram sabhas to identify such trees in their respective village areas and ensure their conservation. Pixabay

The Uttar Pradesh government has decided to conserve trees that are more than 100 years old and give them the status of ‘heritage’.

The Principal Chief Conservator of forests (PCCF) Pawan Kumar recently directed the state’s Forest Department to collaborate with gram sabhas to identify such trees in their respective village areas and ensure their conservation.

After their identification, a display board will be put up near each tree giving details about its age, species and how it is beneficial to both man and animal.

The PCCF said: “I have submitted guidelines on this project to the government and the approval will come in a week’s time. Thereafter, all the DFO’s will be officially informed to start working on this project.

Uttar Pradesh, Conserve, Trees
The Uttar Pradesh government has decided to conserve trees that are more than 100 years old and give them the status of ‘heritage’. Pixabay

“Approximately 60,000 trees will be identified in phase one of this project, which will be led by the a biodiversity management committee. Directions will be sent to railways, cantonment boards and government residential colonies to share information about heritage trees in the area under their jurisdiction and allow the committee to start efforts for their conservation.”

Ramesh Pandey, Chief Conservator of Forest and Secretary, Uttar Pradesh Biodiversity Board, said: “The government’s move to identify and protect old trees is deep-rooted in our tradition of worshipping certain trees and groves.”

He said that the common trees which are older than 100 years old are mostly from the Ficus family such as banyan and peepal and are also called sacred fig.

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“They are deciduous evergreens and many have aerial roots. Also the jamun, tamarind and sal trees are among the oldest trees in this region. We have identified a few century-old trees in the city area and the staff has been directed to speak with the gram pradhan concerned to send a photograph of such old trees to us,” Pandey added. (IANS)

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Plants And Trees Can Curb Pollution More Effectively Than Technology

To start understanding the effect that trees and other plants could have on air pollution, the researchers collected public data on air pollution and vegetation

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A Study found that adding trees or other plants could lower air pollution levels in both urban and rural areas, though the success rates varied depending on, among other factors, how much land was available to grow new plants and the current air quality. Pixabay

Plants and trees may be better and cheaper options than technology to mitigate air pollution, says a new study from an Indian-origin researcher.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, found that adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 per cent.

Researchers found that in 75 per cent of the countries analysed, it was cheaper to use plants to mitigate air pollution than it was to add technological interventions – things like smokestack scrubbers – to the sources of pollution.

“The fact is that traditionally, especially as engineers, we don’t think about nature; we just focus on putting technology into everything,” said Indian-origin researcher and study lead author Bhavik Bakshi from the Ohio State University.

“And so, one key finding is that we need to start looking at nature and learning from it and respecting it. There are win-win opportunities if we do – opportunities that are potentially cheaper and better environmentally,” he added.

To start understanding the effect that trees and other plants could have on air pollution, the researchers collected public data on air pollution and vegetation on a county-by-county basis across the lower 48 states.

Then, they calculated what adding additional trees and plants might cost. Their calculations included the capacity of current vegetation – including trees, grasslands and shrublands – to mitigate air pollution.

They also considered the effect that restorative planting – bringing the vegetation cover of a given county to its county-average levels – might have on air pollution levels.

Plants
Plants and trees may be better and cheaper options than technology to mitigate air pollution, says a new study from an Indian-origin researcher. Pixabay

They estimated the impact of plants on the most common air pollutants – sulfur dioxide, particulate matter that contributes to smog, and nitrogen dioxide.

They found that adding trees or other plants could lower air pollution levels in both urban and rural areas, though the success rates varied depending on, among other factors, how much land was available to grow new plants and the current air quality.

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The findings indicate that nature should be a part of the planning process to deal with air pollution, and show that engineers and builders should find ways to incorporate both technological and ecological systems. (IANS)