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U.S. Researchers Develop A Vacuum-Assisted Toilet for Flight Passengers

They added additional pipe to increase the distance between the toilet bowl and the flush valve and made the pipe attachment at the bowl more of a gradual bend as opposed to a sharp 90-degree angle. 

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The new vacuum-assisted technology can also be used for toilets on cruise ships, trains and even in new green building projects where people are looking at ways to reduce water usage. Pixabay

Airplane toilets are loud. For kids, they could be downright terrifying. Now, a team of US researchers has invented a vacuum-assisted toilet that is about half as loud as the regular airplane commode.

“People have told us they don’t want their kids to be scared to use the bathroom on a flight,” said lead researcher Kent Gee, Professor at the Brigham Young University. “We’ve used good physics to solve the problem.”

It’s been a really hard problem to solve because getting airplane toilets to flush with very little water requires a partial vacuum, which at 38,000 feet, pulls air at nearly half the speed of sound.

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Now that airplanes come with much quieter interiors, toilet flushes reverberate more throughout the cabin. Pixabay

According to the research, conducted in a lab, an air-water mix in vacuum-assisted toilets travels more than 300 miles per hour.

When things move at that speed, any disturbance at all to the flow — like the bend of a pipe or a valve — generates significant noise.

Now that airplanes come with much quieter interiors, toilet flushes reverberate more throughout the cabin.

However, tests of the new contraption show aeroacoustically-generated noise declined 16 decibels during the flush valve opening and about 5-10 decibels when the valve is fully opened, the researchers reported in the Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics journal.

Flight
When things move at that speed, any disturbance at all to the flow — like the bend of a pipe or a valve — generates significant noise. VOA

To solve the problem, the team focused on three valve conditions during the flush cycle: the initial noise level peak associated with the flush valve opening, an intermediate noise level plateau associated with the valve being fully opened and the final noise level peak associated with the flush valve closing.

Also Read: Research Claims, Having A Pet Can Help Older People Stay Physically Active
They added additional pipe to increase the distance between the toilet bowl and the flush valve and made the pipe attachment at the bowl more of a gradual bend as opposed to a sharp 90-degree angle.

The new vacuum-assisted technology can also be used for toilets on cruise ships, trains and even in new green building projects where people are looking at ways to reduce water usage. (IANS)

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Passwords on Sensitive Account Are Still Easy To Guess

The most common name to be used in passwords was "Ashley", followed by "Michael", "Daniel", "Jessica" and "Charlie".

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"Nobody should protect sensitive data with something that can be guessed, like their first name, local football team or favourite band," Pixabay

Millions of people are using easy-to-guess passwords on sensitive accounts, with “123456” being the most widely-used on breached accounts, suggests a security study.

The study by the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) helped to uncover the gaps in cyber-knowledge that could leave people in danger of being exploited, the BBC reported on Sunday.

For its first cyber-survey, the NCSC analysed public databases of breached accounts to see which words, phrases and strings people used.

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Security expert Troy Hunt, who maintains a database of hacked account data, said picking a good password was the “single biggest control” people had over their online security.
Pixabay

Top of the list was “123456”, appearing in more than 23 million passwords. The second-most popular string, “123456789”, was not much harder to crack, while others in the top five included “qwerty”, “password” and “1111111”.

The most common name to be used in passwords was “Ashley”, followed by “Michael”, “Daniel”, “Jessica” and “Charlie”.

When it comes to Premier League football teams in passwords, “Liverpool” came first and “Chelsea” second. “Blink-182” topped the charts of music acts.

hacking
For its first cyber-survey, the NCSC analysed public databases of breached accounts to see which words, phrases and strings people used. Pixabay

People who use well-known words or names for a password put themselves people at risk of being hacked, said Ian Levy, technical director of the NCSC.

“Nobody should protect sensitive data with something that can be guessed, like their first name, local football team or favourite band,” he said.

Also Read: Violent Relationships Can Increase The Risk Of Mental Disorder in Women

Security expert Troy Hunt, who maintains a database of hacked account data, said picking a good password was the “single biggest control” people had over their online security.

“We typically haven’t done a very good job of that either as individuals or as the organisations asking us to register with them.” (IANS)