Wednesday September 19, 2018

Study: Vaping can Damage Immune System Cells

Previous studies have focused on the chemical composition of e-cigarette liquid before it is vaped

0
//
24
Vaping
Vaping damages vital immune system cells: Study. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Vaping can damage vital immune system cells and may be more harmful than previously thought, a study suggests.

Researchers found e-cigarette vapour disabled important immune cells in the lung and boosted inflammation, the BBC reported.

A small experimental study, led by Professor David Thickett, at the University of Birmingham, showed that in only over 48 hours the vapour from e-cigarette caused inflammation and impaired activity of alveolar macrophages — cells that remove potentially damaging dust particles, bacteria and allergens.

For the study, the researchers devised a mechanical procedure to mimic vaping in the laboratory, using lung tissue samples provided by eight non-smokers.

The research which is still in its infancy was published online in the journal Thorax.

Thickett said: “In terms of cancer causing molecules in cigarette smoke, as opposed to cigarette vapour, there are certainly reduced numbers of carcinogens.

Vaping
Vaping. Pixabay

“They are safer in terms of cancer risk — but if you vape for 20 or 30 years and this can cause COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), then that’s something we need to know about.”

“We should have a cautious scepticism that they are as safe as we are being led to believe,” Thickett said.

Thickett said some of the effects were similar to those seen in regular smokers and people with chronic lung disease.

Also Read about Multi-gene Test: Multi-gene Test May Help to Diagnose The Risk of Heart Disease, Diabetes And More

He, however, caution the results are only in laboratory conditions and advise further research is needed to better understand the long-term health impact.

This is a “caution against the widely held opinion” that vaping can be used to aid in giving up cigarettes, the researcher said.

Previous studies have focused on the chemical composition of e-cigarette liquid before it is vaped. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Decoded: How Cancer Cells Cripple Immune System

Anti-PD1 therapy blocks interaction between PD-1 -- a protein on the surface of T-cells -- and PD-L1, PD-1's counterpart molecule on tumour cells, thus reinvigorating T-cells and allowing them to unleash killing power on the tumour

0
cancer cells
The research offers a paradigm-shifting picture of how cancers take a systemic approach to suppressing the immune system. Pixabay

Researchers have found that cancer cells send out biological “drones” to fight the immune system and survive.

The study showed that cancer cells release “drones” — small vesicles called exosomes circulating in the blood and armed with proteins called PD-L1 that cause T-cells to tire before they have a chance to reach the tumour.

The research offers a paradigm-shifting picture of how cancers take a systemic approach to suppressing the immune system.

In addition, it also points to a new way to predict which cancer patients will respond to anti-PD1 therapy that disrupts immune suppression to fight tumours.

“Immunotherapies are life-saving for many patients with metastatic melanoma, but about 70 per cent of these patients don’t respond,” said Guo Wei, Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

“These treatments are costly and have toxic side effects so it would be very helpful to know which patients are going to respond,” Wei added.

Cancer
Representational image. Pixabay

Anti-PD1 therapy blocks interaction between PD-1 — a protein on the surface of T-cells — and PD-L1, PD-1’s counterpart molecule on tumour cells, thus reinvigorating T-cells and allowing them to unleash killing power on the tumour.

In the study, published in the journal Nature, the team found that exosomes from human melanoma cells also carried PD-L1 on their surface. Exosomal PD-L1 can directly bind to and inhibit T-cell functions.

Identification of the exosomal PD-L1 secreted by tumour cells provides a major update to the immune checkpoint mechanism, and offers novel insight into tumour immune evasion.

Also Read: SPF30 Sunscreens may Delay Onset of Skin Cancer

According to the researchers, exosomes are tiny lipid-encapsulated vesicles with a diameter less than 1/100 of a red blood cell.

Since a single tumour cell is able to secrete many copies of exosomes, the interaction between the PD-L1 exosomes and T-cells provides a systemic and highly effective means to suppress anti-tumour immunity in the whole body. This may explain why cancer patients might have weakened immune system, they noted. (IANS)

Next Story