Friday November 16, 2018

Study: Vaping can Damage Immune System Cells

Previous studies have focused on the chemical composition of e-cigarette liquid before it is vaped

0
//
Vaping, teeth
Vaping may not stain teeth: Study. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Vaping can damage vital immune system cells and may be more harmful than previously thought, a study suggests.

Researchers found e-cigarette vapour disabled important immune cells in the lung and boosted inflammation, the BBC reported.

A small experimental study, led by Professor David Thickett, at the University of Birmingham, showed that in only over 48 hours the vapour from e-cigarette caused inflammation and impaired activity of alveolar macrophages — cells that remove potentially damaging dust particles, bacteria and allergens.

For the study, the researchers devised a mechanical procedure to mimic vaping in the laboratory, using lung tissue samples provided by eight non-smokers.

The research which is still in its infancy was published online in the journal Thorax.

Thickett said: “In terms of cancer causing molecules in cigarette smoke, as opposed to cigarette vapour, there are certainly reduced numbers of carcinogens.

Vaping
Vaping. Pixabay

“They are safer in terms of cancer risk — but if you vape for 20 or 30 years and this can cause COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), then that’s something we need to know about.”

“We should have a cautious scepticism that they are as safe as we are being led to believe,” Thickett said.

Thickett said some of the effects were similar to those seen in regular smokers and people with chronic lung disease.

Also Read about Multi-gene Test: Multi-gene Test May Help to Diagnose The Risk of Heart Disease, Diabetes And More

He, however, caution the results are only in laboratory conditions and advise further research is needed to better understand the long-term health impact.

This is a “caution against the widely held opinion” that vaping can be used to aid in giving up cigarettes, the researcher said.

Previous studies have focused on the chemical composition of e-cigarette liquid before it is vaped. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

E-cigarettes May Not Stain Teeth, says Study

Conversely, exposure to vapour from the e-cigarettes or tobacco heating products resulted in little or no colour change that was comparable to the untreated controls

0
Vaping, teeth
Vaping may not stain teeth: Study. Pixabay

E-cigarettes and tobacco heating products cause significantly less staining to teeth than conventional cigarettes, a new study has found.

While cigarette smoke caused significant enamel discolouration, vapour from the e-cigarettes and aerosol from the tobacco heating products caused only minimal staining.

These next generation products do not involve combustion; the vapour and aerosol they produce are less complex and contain significantly lower levels of certain toxicants compared to cigarette smoke.

“Many studies have postulated that it is the tar in cigarette smoke that stains teeth,” said Annette Dalrymple, senior scientist at British American Tobacco in the UK.

“The study clearly shows that the e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products assessed caused minimal discolouration — very promising for consumers. However, further studies are required to understand the long-term effect on teeth staining and oral health when smokers switch to using next generation products,” Dalrymple added.

e-cigarettes
In this April 11, 2018, photo, an unidentified 15-year-old high school student uses a vaping device near the school’s campus in Cambridge, Mass. Health and education officials across the country are raising alarms over wide underage use of e-cigarettes and other vaping products. The devices heat liquid into an inhalable vapor that’s sold in sugary flavors like mango and mint — and often with the addictive drug nicotine. VOA

For the study, published in the journal American Journal of Dentistry, the team assessed and compared an e-cigarette, a tobacco heating product and a conventional cigarette for their impact on teeth enamel staining.

They assessed in the laboratory the level of enamel discoloration by cigarette smoke and vapour from e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products.

Tests were carried out on enamel blocks cut from bovine incisors — substitute for human teeth in dental research.

The enamel blocks were exposed to the particulate matter (isolated from the smoke/vapour) for 14 days and then whole smoke/vapour for five days.

e-Cigarette
e-Cigarette, Pixabay

The enamel samples were assessed before, during and after treatment and colour readings were determined using an established method involving spectrophotometer and trained scientists.

Also Read- 4 Gentle Online Games That Make You Smarter

Discolouration of enamel blocks exposed to cigarette smoke was apparent in as little as one day and continued to increase as the concentration of cigarette smoke increased, the findings revealed.

Conversely, exposure to vapour from the e-cigarettes or tobacco heating products resulted in little or no colour change that was comparable to the untreated controls. (IANS)