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Videos on Plastic Surgery Found on YouTube Can be Misleading, Study Reveals

YouTube is for marketing. The majority of the people who post these videos are trying to sell you something

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YouTube
YouTube bans dangerous, harmful pranks. Pixabay

Do you turn to YouTube for advice on cosmetic surgery procedures? Beware, most of these are misleading marketing campaigns posted by non-qualified medical professionals, researchers have warned.

Researchers at the Rutgers University found that the millions of people who turn to YouTube as a source for education on facial plastic surgery receive a false understanding that does not include the risks of alternative options.

“Videos on facial plastic surgery may be mainly marketing campaigns and may not fully be intended as educational,” said lead author Boris Paskhover, Assistant Professor at the varsity.

For the study, the team evaluated 240 top-viewed videos with 160 million combined views that resulted from keyword searches for ‘blepharoplasty’, ‘eyelid surgery’, ‘dermal fillers’, ‘facial fillers’, ‘otoplasty’, ‘ear surgery’, ‘rhytidectomy’, ‘facelift’, ‘lip augmentation’, ‘lip fillers’, “rhinoplasty’ and/or ‘nose job’.

The researchers also evaluated the people who posted the videos, including whether they were health care professionals, patients or third parties.

YouTube
Even videos posted by legitimate board-certified surgeons may be marketing tools made to look like educational videos. Pixabay

A majority of videos did not include professionals qualified in the procedures portrayed, including 94 videos with no medical professional at all.

Even videos posted by legitimate board-certified surgeons may be marketing tools made to look like educational videos, Paskhover noted.

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“Patients and physicians who use YouTube for educational purposes should be aware that these videos can present biased information, be unbalanced when evaluating risks versus benefits and be unclear about the qualifications of the practitioner,” he said.

“YouTube is for marketing. The majority of the people who post these videos are trying to sell you something,” he stated. (IANS)

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YouTube Bans Dangerous, Harmful Pranks From its Platform

Recently, a challenge inspired by a scene in Netflix show Birdbox involved carrying out activities - such as driving - while blindfolded. At least one person is known to have crashed as a result

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YouTube
YouTube bans dangerous, harmful pranks. Pixabay

YouTube videos that depict dangerous or emotionally distressing “pranks” have been banned from the platform.

The move comes in response to the so-called “challenges” that have sometimes resulted in death or injury, the BBC reported on Wednesday.

The Google-owned video sharing site said such material had “no place on YouTube”.

But enforcing its new rules on pranks may prove to be difficult, given ambiguity over what may or may not be considered harmful.

“YouTube is home to many beloved viral challenges and pranks,” a message added to the site’s FAQ section read.

“That said, we’ve always had policies to make sure what’s funny doesn’t cross the line into also being harmful or dangerous.

YouTube
YouTube. Pixabay

“Our Community Guidelines prohibit content that encourages dangerous activities that are likely to result in serious harm.”

From now on, the site said it would not allow videos that featured “pranks with a perceived danger of serious physical injury”.

This includes pranks where someone is tricked into thinking they are in severe danger, even if no real threat existed.

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The site added: “We also don’t allow pranks that cause children to experience severe emotional distress, meaning something so bad that it could leave the child traumatized for life.”

Recently, a challenge inspired by a scene in Netflix show Birdbox involved carrying out activities – such as driving – while blindfolded. At least one person is known to have crashed as a result. (IANS)