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Vintage Phone Museum: The museum having rare collection of classic cell phones opens in Slovakia

The museum has around 1,500 cell phone models

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Old Nokia mobile phones are placed on a shelf inside of a private museum of phones in Dobsina, Slovakia
Old Nokia mobile phones are placed on a shelf inside of a private museum of phones in Dobsina, Slovakia. VOA
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Dobsina, Slovakia, September 10, 2017:

As new smartphones hit the market month in month out, one Slovak technology buff is offering visitors to his vintage phone museum a trip down memory lane – to when cell phones weighed more than today’s computers and most people couldn’t afford them.

Twenty-six-year-old online marketing specialist Stefan Polgari from Slovakia began his collection more than two years ago when he bought a stock of old cell phones online. Today, his collection at the vintage phone museum boasts some 1,500 models, or 3,500 pieces when counting duplicates.

The vintage phone museum (website: http://www.mobilephonemuseum.org/), which takes up two rooms in his house in the small eastern town of Dobsina, opened last year and is accessible by appointment.

The collection includes the Nokia 3310, which recently got a facelift and re-release, as well as a fully functional, 20-year old, brick-like Siemens S4 model, which cost a whopping 23,000 Slovak koruna – more than twice the average monthly wage in Slovakia when it came out.

“These are design and technology masterpieces that did not steal your time. There are no phones younger than the first touchscreen models, definitely no smartphones,” said Mr. Polgari.

“It’s hard to say which phone is most valuable to me, perhaps the Nokia 3510i Star Wars edition,” said Mr. Polgari – who uses an iPhone in his daily life. (VOA)

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Apple iPhone Soon to Track Binge Eating Disorder

It can classify if the heart is beating in a normal pattern or whether there are signs of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib), a heart condition that could lead to major health complications

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Apple iPhone to soon decode binge eating disorder. Wikimedia commons

A team of researchers in the US is set to use Apple iPhone and Watch to track binge eating disorder among people.

According to University of North Carolina’s Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders, if you are 18, have an iPhone (model 5 or newer), and have a current or lifetime experience with binge eating disorder (BED) or bulimia nervosa (BN), you can participate in the study titled “Binge Eating Genetics Initiative” (BEGIN).

“The goal of the BEGIN study is to better understand the genetic factors that may be associated with binge-eating disorder and bulimia nervosa in order to develop better treatments for the millions of people who suffer from these illnesses,” the university said on its website.

The researchers will use the Recovery Record app on iPhone to record the participants’ mood, food and goals for 30 days.

They will ask the participants to provide a sample of their saliva and bodily bacteria.

“Once you enroll in the BEGIN study using your iPhone, we will send you a ‘BEGIN box’ via FedEx that will include everything that you need to participate in the study,” the university said.

Health
Restricting meal intake in 10-hour window may boost health. Pixabay

According to a report in CNBC on Monday, the university hopes to recruit 1,000 participants.

Each participant will be given a free Watch from Apple and researchers will monitor their heart rate using the device’s sensor over the course of a month to see if there are spikes before binge eating episodes, said the report.

Apple Watch Series 4 will soon enable US customers to take an electrocardiogram (ECG) reading right from the wrist using the new ECG app, which takes advantage of the electrodes built into the Digital Crown and new electrical heart rate sensor in the back crystal.

Also Read- India Continues Engaging With USA Over H-1B Passport Issue

With the app, users touch the Digital Crown and after 30 seconds, receive a heart rhythm classification.

It can classify if the heart is beating in a normal pattern or whether there are signs of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib), a heart condition that could lead to major health complications.

All recordings, their associated classifications and any noted symptoms are stored in the Health app in a PDF that can be shared with physicians. (IANS)