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Having been around for nearly five years now, Virtual Reality (VR) headsets are yet to find adoption among the masses. Pixabay

Having been around for nearly five years now, Virtual Reality (VR) headsets are yet to find adoption among the masses. You only find them tucked away in a corner at the neighbourhood mall where kids wearing head-mounted devices (HMDs) experience virtual games. Even those who bought VR headsets — either as an independent unit or bundled with smartphones — have dumped those at home.

According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), the global Augmented Reality (AR) and VR headset market returned to growth after a full year of decline in the first quarter this year, as global shipments reached 1.3 million — up 27.2 per cent — from the same quarter last year.


VR headsets represented 96.6 per cent of the combined AR/VR market during the quarter with strong volumes from top companies such as Sony, Facebook, HTC, Pico and 3Glasses. There is no doubt that enterprise AR is evolving quickly, especially in the fields of healthcare, education and at firms that aim to enhance customer experiences.

“Many companies are actively looking for hardware solutions they can use to improve existing business processes and drive new ones,” says Tom Mainelli, Group Vice President, Consumer and Devices Research, at IDC. However, VR headsets have failed to strike a chord with the consumers.


VR technology is not able to rule out nausea and other health-related issues while experiencing it. Pixabay

“One of the main reasons why VR is not booming into the consumer segment is because of the uncomfortable, clunky headsets — even early VR adopters have complained of mental fatigue due to prolonged use of VR headsets,” Prabhu Ram, Head – Industry Intelligence Group (IIG), CMR, told IANS. “Secondly, there is a clear dearth of quality VR content that one could watch,” he added.

Reports suggest that even as a relatively young technology, AR has shown more promise than VR as it involves adding visual elements to the real world — typically via smartphones. Unlike VR, it does not push users into distinct virtual environments.

According to Delhi-based tech entrepreneur Tanuj Malhotra, who is working on his own VR startup called VRover, the technology is not going to come to life anytime soon. “It is impossible for VR to take off and compete with AR unless vendors make some serious changes from the consumers’ perspective,” said Malhotra.

“VR content out there is not readily available to consumers. Also, the VR technology is not able to rule out nausea and other health-related issues while experiencing it,” he added.


VR headsets have failed to strike a chord with the consumers. Pixabay

According to Jack McCauley, one of the co-founders of Oculus, Facebook-acquired VR firm Oculus may not be profitable as the social networking giant is struggling to bring VR to the mainstream consumer market. “There are a lot of fundamental issues that remain unresolved with VR gaming,” McCauley, who stayed through Facebook’s $2 billion acquisition of the company in March 2014, told CNBC.

ALSO READ: Hyundai Mobis to Replace Side View Mirrors with Camera Monitoring System

McCauley mentioned how people still get nauseated when they put on a VR headset and how they still prefer to play video games alongside their friends on a 2D display. “Consumer interest in VR, while still in its infancy, will see a slow and steady traction as specific use-cases, such as gaming, are pushed forth,” noted Ram. IDC expects standalone and tethered headsets to drive the VR market growth.

“Standalone VR headsets will capture 38.2 per cent of the VR market in 2019, up from 26.6 per cent in 2018. Tethered VR headsets will have a share of 46.1 per cent this year, versus 44.1 per cent last year. Finally, screen-less viewers will decline to 15.7 per cent, down from 29.3 per cent last year,” the IDC predicted. (IANS)


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The aim of the book is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

By Siddhi Jain

Delhi-based author Pritisha Borthakur is set to release her new book, 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories'. The 1,404-word children's book was put together to address a new kind of societal debacle in the family system. The author says the aim is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

The author who named the book after her twin sons -- Puhor and Niyor -- is a parent who has seen and heard the tales of ridicule and discrimination suffered by many in India and beyond. She says the book is an artistic illustration for kids that details how different families can live and coexist. Whether it's children with two dads or two moms, children with a single dad or single mom, and even multiracial family units, Borthakur's book teaches love, understanding, and compassion towards unconventional families.

Beyond race, gender, color, and ethnicity which have formed the bases for discrimination since the beginning of time, this book aims to bring to light a largely ignored issue. For so long, single parents have been treated like a taboo without any attempt to understand their situations; no one really cares how or why one's marriage ended but just wants to treat single parents as villains simply for choosing happiness and loving their children.

Homosexual parents, a relatively new family system, is another form that has suffered hate and discrimination for many years. Pritisha emphasizes the need to understand that diversity in people and family is what makes the world beautiful and colourful. 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race, and even differences in background

four children standing on dirt during daytime 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race and even differences in background. | Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash


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Clean and maintained hands boost confidence in daily life activities.

If you feel that clean and well-groomed hands are just an essential prerequisite for women, you might like to think twice. Men should equally pay attention to their hands because our hand houses 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of its skin. You can easily assume what havoc it can create in our body because in India we have the culture of eating with our hands and spaces beneath nails can become breeding heaven for germs. Moreover, clean and maintained hands boost confidence in their daily life activities. Therefore, it's important to keep your hands clean irrespective of your gender by washing or sanitizing at regular intervals. And, to keep them groomed, you don't have to visit a salon.

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* Refrain from harsh soaps: You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. Your soap can have a moisturizing element in it like aloe vera or shea butter. Ensure that you're washing your hands with normal water as hot water can make your hand's skin dry and scaly.

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Bitcoin will grow by a tenfold

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