Monday February 18, 2019

Maternal Deficiency Of Vitamin D May Up Childhood Obesity Risk

Children born to mothers with very low Vitamin D levels during their first trimester are likely to have bigger waists or be about half an inch plumper on average by age six

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

Babies born to women who suffered from Vitamin D deficiency during their pregnancy are more likely to develop obesity in childhood as well as in adulthood, a study has found.

Children born to mothers with very low Vitamin D levels during their first trimester are likely to have bigger waists or be about half an inch plumper on average by age six.

“These increases may not seem like much, but we’re not talking about older adults who have about 30 percent body fat,” said Vaia Lida Chatzi, Associate Professor at the University of Southern California in the US.

ALSO READ: Calcium, Vitamin D are not harmful for older adults

“Even a half-inch increase in waist circumference is a big deal, especially if you project this fat surplus across their lifespan,” Chatzi added.

obesity
These kids also had two percent more body fat, than peers whose mothers had enough Vitamin D in early pregnancy. Pixabay

About 95 percent of the Vitamin D produced in your body comes from sunshine, Chatzi said.

The remaining five percent is derived from eggs, fatty fish, fish liver oil and fortified foods such as milk, cheese, yogurt, and cereal.

ALSO READ: Vitamin D can helpful in Recovery from Burn Injuries

For the study, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, the team examined 532 mother-child pairs, whereby maternal Vitamin D concentrations were measured during the first prenatal visit.

The results showed that about 66 percent of the pregnant women had insufficient Vitamin D in the first trimester — a critical period for organ development.

Chatzi said, “Optimal vitamin D levels in pregnancy could protect against childhood obesity, but more research is needed to confirm our findings. Vitamin D supplements in early pregnancy is an easy fix to protect future.” (IANS)

Next Story

Vitamin D Helps Body Clear TB Bugs: Study

For the study, researchers included 1,850 patients who received antibiotic treatment.

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Vitamin D helps combat drug-resistant TB
Vitamin D pills can prevent TB disease. Pixabay

Vitamin D, commonly known as the “sunshine vitamin”, can combat tuberculosis (TB) bacteria found in the lungs of people with multi-drug resistant TB, according to latest research.

The study showed that when added to antibiotic treatment, vitamin D was found to treat TB specifically in patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB.

The vitamin D supplementation was also found to be safe at the doses administered, with no links to serious adverse events, findings further revealed in the European Respiratory Journal.

Vitamin D plays an important role in preventing TB.
Vitamin D is best known for its effects on bone health. Pixabay

“Multi-drug resistant TB is on the rise globally. It’s notoriously difficult to treat, and it carries a much worse prognosis than standard TB,” said Lead Researcher Adrian Martineau, Professor from Queen Mary University of London.

“Our study raises the possibility that vitamin D — which is very safe and inexpensive — could benefit this hard-to-treat group of patients by taking a novel approach to their treatment,” said Martineau.

The immune system could be given a boost by adding vitamin D to antibiotic treatment to help the body clear TB bugs, rather than relying on antibiotics on their own to kill the bacteria directly, the study suggested.

Vitamin D acts as an antibiotic treatment.
Vitamin D boosts the immune system. Pixabay

While vitamin D is best known for its effects on bone health, previous studies have shown its role in protecting against colds, flu, asthma attacks, and that it can also protect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from deadly lung attacks.

MDR TB is caused by bacteria that are resistant to treatment with at least two of the most powerful first-line anti-TB drugs, causing around 500,000 cases and 150,000 deaths per year worldwide, the study noted.

ALSO READ: As Per Study, High-Risk HPV Lead to Increased CVD

For the study, researchers included 1,850 patients who received antibiotic treatment. (IANS)