Saturday April 20, 2019

Maternal Deficiency Of Vitamin D May Up Childhood Obesity Risk

Children born to mothers with very low Vitamin D levels during their first trimester are likely to have bigger waists or be about half an inch plumper on average by age six

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

Babies born to women who suffered from Vitamin D deficiency during their pregnancy are more likely to develop obesity in childhood as well as in adulthood, a study has found.

Children born to mothers with very low Vitamin D levels during their first trimester are likely to have bigger waists or be about half an inch plumper on average by age six.

“These increases may not seem like much, but we’re not talking about older adults who have about 30 percent body fat,” said Vaia Lida Chatzi, Associate Professor at the University of Southern California in the US.

ALSO READ: Calcium, Vitamin D are not harmful for older adults

“Even a half-inch increase in waist circumference is a big deal, especially if you project this fat surplus across their lifespan,” Chatzi added.

obesity
These kids also had two percent more body fat, than peers whose mothers had enough Vitamin D in early pregnancy. Pixabay

About 95 percent of the Vitamin D produced in your body comes from sunshine, Chatzi said.

The remaining five percent is derived from eggs, fatty fish, fish liver oil and fortified foods such as milk, cheese, yogurt, and cereal.

ALSO READ: Vitamin D can helpful in Recovery from Burn Injuries

For the study, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, the team examined 532 mother-child pairs, whereby maternal Vitamin D concentrations were measured during the first prenatal visit.

The results showed that about 66 percent of the pregnant women had insufficient Vitamin D in the first trimester — a critical period for organ development.

Chatzi said, “Optimal vitamin D levels in pregnancy could protect against childhood obesity, but more research is needed to confirm our findings. Vitamin D supplements in early pregnancy is an easy fix to protect future.” (IANS)

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High Doses of Vitamin D Can Severely Impact Your Kidney

Calcium levels may get worse before getting better in patients even after cessation of supplements, as vitamin D is fat soluble.

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"Our experience informs us that patients and clinicians should be better informed about the risks regarding the unfettered use of vitamin D," suggested the researchers. Pixabay

In a rare case, a 54-year-old man, after returning from a trip to Southeast Asia where he spent much of his holiday sunbathing, was diagnosed with kidney damage after he took high doses of vitamin D for years.

After referral to a kidney specialist and further testing, it was discovered that the man had been prescribed high doses of vitamin D by a naturopath, who recommended a dose of 8 drops every day, according to a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

vitamin D
Clinicians must be aware of the risks of vitamin D use to limit complications related to hypercalcemia. Pixabay

Over two-and-a-half-years, the patient, who did not have a history of bone loss or vitamin D deficiency, took 8-12 drops of vitamin D daily, totalling 8,000-12,000 IU.

As a result, he had very high levels of calcium in the blood which left him with significant kidney damage.

The recommended daily allowance of vitamin D is 400-1000 IU, with 800-2000 IU recommended for adults at high-risk of osteoporosis and for older adults.

“Although vitamin D toxicity is rare owing to a large therapeutic range, its widespread availability in various over-the-counter formulations may pose a substantial risk to uninformed patients,” said Bourne Auguste from the University of Toronto.

Clinicians must be aware of the risks of vitamin D use to limit complications related to hypercalcemia.

vitamin D
“Although vitamin D toxicity is rare owing to a large therapeutic range, its widespread availability in various over-the-counter formulations may pose a substantial risk to uninformed patients,” said Bourne Auguste from the University of Toronto. Pixabay

Also Read: What’s the True Cost of Cybercrime?
Calcium levels may get worse before getting better in patients even after cessation of supplements, as vitamin D is fat soluble.

“Our experience informs us that patients and clinicians should be better informed about the risks regarding the unfettered use of vitamin D,” suggested the researchers. (IANS)