Monday April 6, 2020

Vitamin E Can Help Treat Fatty Liver Disease in HIV Patients: Study

Vitamin E safe for fatty liver in HIV patients

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Vitamin E
A type of fatty liver disease that commonly affects patients with HIV can be safely treated with vitamin E. Pixabay

A type of fatty liver disease that commonly affects patients with HIV can be safely treated with vitamin E, health and lifestyle researchers have found.

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and is characterised by liver inflammation and cell damage.

It is a potentially dangerous condition that can progress to cirrhosis or liver cancer.

“Vitamin E has been shown to improve fatty liver in the general population, here we provide evidence for its beneficial effect and safety in people living with the HIV, who have a higher prevalence of fatty liver disease,” said study lead author Giada Sebastiani, Associate Professor in McGill University in Canada.

Vitamin E
For the study, published in the journal AIDS, 27 patients with HIV and NASH were given vitamin E in an easily-tolerated dose of two pills per day. Pixabay

The researchers noted that NAFLD currently affects up to 48 per cent of Canadians living with HIV and 25 per cent of the general population, while NASH affects about one third of patients with NAFLD.

There are several theories to explain the high prevalence of fatty liver among the HIV-positive patients, they said.

“It is possibly due to HIV-related inflammation, the anti-retroviral drugs that they have to take lifelong, and to the very frequent metabolic problems, such as diabetes and high lipids. Unfortunately, there is no approved therapy for fatty liver in people living with HIV,” Sebastiani added.

For the study, published in the journal AIDS, 27 patients with HIV and NASH were given vitamin E in an easily-tolerated dose of two pills per day.

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“We found that vitamin E improved both liver transaminases (the main blood tests for liver function) and liver fat measured by a non-invasive ultrasonographic test,” Sebastiani said.

“These improvements were even more marked than those reported in the HIV-uninfected population.” Although she suspected vitamin E would reduce inflammation and fat in the HIV-positive group, Sebastiani added. (IANS)

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Pregnant Women Having High Blood Pressure Have Greater Heart Disease Risk: Study

The study suggests that all women be screened for preeclampsia throughout their pregnancy and that treatment be given to those with preeclampsia within five years after birth

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Pregnant
Approximately two to eight per cent of pregnant women worldwide are diagnosed with preeclampsia, a complication characterised by high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy in women whose blood pressure had been normal. Pixabay

Women with high blood pressure in their first pregnancy have a greater risk of heart attack or cardiovascular death, researchers have warned.

“Women who were diagnosed with preeclampsia tended also to have a history of chronic high blood pressure, gestational diabetes and kidney disease and other medical conditions,” said study lead author Mary Downes Gastrich, Associate Professor at Rutgers University in the US.

Approximately two to eight per cent of pregnant women worldwide are diagnosed with preeclampsia, a complication characterised by high blood pressure that usually begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy in women whose blood pressure had been normal.

Doctors haven’t identified a single cause, but it is thought to be related to insufficiently formed placental blood vessels. Preeclampsia is also the cause of 15 per cent of premature births in the US.

For the findings, the researchers analysed cardiovascular disease in 6,360 women, age 18 to 54, who were pregnant for the first time and diagnosed with preeclampsia in New Jersey hospitals from 1999 to 2013 and compared them to pregnant women without preeclampsia.

Heart
Women with high blood pressure in their first pregnancy have a greater risk of heart attack or cardiovascular death, researchers have warned. Pixabay

They found that those with the condition were four times more likely to suffer a heart attack or cardiovascular death and more than two times more likely to die from other causes during the 15-year study period.

The study suggests that all women be screened for preeclampsia throughout their pregnancy and that treatment be given to those with preeclampsia within five years after birth.

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“Medication such as low-dose aspirin also may be effective in bringing down blood pressure as early as the second trimester,” Gastrich said. (IANS)