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Vivo Readying to Launch Products Across Price-points in India

The company is planning to do away with "online" only devices and said all its upcoming smartphones would be available both online and at brick-and-mortar stores

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Vivo
Vivo announces Rs 4,000 crore investment for new UP plant. (IANS)

As the competition gets fierce in the Indian smartphone market, Chinese player Vivo is geared up to launch devices across price points in the next six months, a top company executive said on Tuesday.

According to Nipun Marya, Head of Marketing Strategy, Vivo India, the company is focusing on multi-dimensional strategies to fend off growing competition, especially in the offline segment.

“We will offer products in multiple price points… whether it is the Rs 10,000 price bracket, the Rs 20,000-Rs 30,000 segment or the premium segment (Rs 30,000 and above),” Marya told IANS in an interview.

Vivo India had an overall share of 60.7 per cent (by volume) in the Rs 20,000-Rs 25,000 segment (for the month of April) and 53 per cent share in the Rs 20,000-Rs 30,000 price segment, according to German research firm GfK, which tracks sales to end consumers.

The company, which is set to launch a nearly bezel-less smartphone “NEX S” in India on July 19, said it is also making rapid strides in innovation and the under-display fingerprint scanner was one such step.

“Vivo X21” is the first smartphone with an in-display fingerprint scanner that recently arrived in India.

The upcoming “NEX S” smartphone features an all-glass design with 90 per cent of screen-to-body ratio and unlike a majority of smartphone makers, Vivo has ditched the “notch” in the device.

Vivo
Representational image.

Another USP of the device, according to Vivo, is the placement of the earpiece speaker — also under the display.

“The phone uses a new technology called ‘screen soundcasting’, that turns a screen into audio output,” Marya told IANS.

“We have more India-focused R&D innovations in the pipeline and want to become a full-range player in the country,” he added.

The company last month launched Vivo Y83 under its Y series of product portfolio. Priced at Rs 14,990, the device sports “FullView” Display 2.0 and houses 4GB RAM and 32GB ROM (expandable up to 256GB), 13MP rear camera and 3260mAh battery.

Focused on strengthening its offline presence, Vivo said handing over the right product to end users is what matters the most.

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The smartphone player already has brand ambassadors stationed at its retail and exclusive stores across the country, who are well equipped to handle queries related to both the software and the product as well as users’ complaints.

“India is a vast country and you have to have proper reach. We made that by increasing the number of our retail outlets. We expanded our distribution network with over 70,000 Vivo retail stores and more than 250 Vivo exclusive stores,” Marya informed.

The company is planning to do away with “online” only devices and said all its upcoming smartphones would be available both online and at brick-and-mortar stores.

“We have a manufacturing facility in Greater Noida where all smartphones being sold in India are made,” Marya noted. (IANS)

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HPV Vaccination May Bring An End To Cervical Cancer In India by 2070

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

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Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations. Pixabay

Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening and vaccination must be taken up on a war footing in countries like India to prevent 15 million cervical cancer deaths among women by 2050, a Lancet research said.

Causing the second-highest number of deaths among Indian women among cancer variants, cervical cancer, in a majority of cases, is caused by HPV, a group of more than 150 viruses.

The efforts might even result in cervical cancer being eliminated as a public health hazard in India by 2070-79, according to the study, published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

Cancer
“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS. Pixabay

If the high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening cannot be achieved globally, over 44 million women could be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the next 50 years with two-thirds of these cases and an additional estimated 15 million deaths, would occur in countries with low and medium levels of development.

“More than two thirds of cases prevented would be in countries with low and medium levels of human development like India, Nigeria, and Malawi, where there has so far been limited access to HPV vaccination or cervical screening,” said lead author Professor Karen Canfell from the Cancer Council New South Wales in Australia.

However, large disparities exist in cervical screening and HPV vaccination coverage among countries.

“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS.

“While societal barriers prevent women from seeking medical help in advance, women are forced to come out at a later stage when the disease has reached an advanced stage,” she said.

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Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said. Pixabay

However, Canfell says that despite the enormity of the problem, their findings suggest that “global elimination is within reach with tools that are already available, provided that both high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening can be achieved.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations.

Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said.

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“Diagnostic tests such as the pap smear are effective in identifying cancerous tendencies.

“However, these tests are available with a limited number of providers and largely within the cities. This makes screening sporadic and leaves out women who live in rural areas,” Aneja added. (IANS)