Tuesday March 31, 2020

VR Can Now Allow Patients to Follow Physiotherapy at Home

Virtual avatars can help perform physiotherapy at home

0
//
Physiotherapy
Virtual Reality (VR) combined with 3D Motion technology could allow physiotherapy to be translated onto a virtual avatar whom the patient can follow at home with ease. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Virtual Reality (VR) combined with 3D Motion technology could allow physiotherapy to be translated onto a virtual avatar whom the patient can follow at home with ease, say researchers.

Outside of the clinic, patients rarely receive any guidance other than a leaflet of sketches or static photographs to instruct them how to complete their exercises.

This leads to poor adherence, with patients becoming anxious about not getting the exercise right, or simply getting bored by the repetitiveness of the movements.

“There is huge potential for consumer VR technologies to be used for both providing guidance to physiotherapy exercises, but also to make the exercises more interesting,” said Dr Mark Elliott, Principal investigator on the project from University of Warwick.

Physiotherapy
The digitally-enabled technological solution can underpin transformative health innovations to impact the field of physiotherapy, and have a direct benefit to patients’ rehabilitation. (Representational Image). Pixabay

To reach this conclusion, the researchers asked participants to step in time with an avatar viewed through a VR headset.

Unknown to the participants, the researchers subtly slowed down or speeded up one of the avatar’s steps, such that the participants would have to correct their own stepping movement to stay in time.

The effect this correction had on their step timing and synchronisation with the avatar was measured.

“We found that participants struggled to keep in time if only visual information was present,” said lead author Omar Khan from WMG, University of Warwick.

However, “when we added realistic footstep sounds in addition to the visual information, the more realistic multisensory information allowed participants to accurately follow the avatar,” Khan added in a paper published in the Journal PLOS ONE.

Also Read: Sudden Fall of WeWork Inspires The Creation of Second TV Series on Apple TV+

The digitally-enabled technological solution can underpin transformative health innovations to impact the field of physiotherapy, and have a direct benefit to patients’ rehabilitation.

“We now plan to investigate other types of movements working closely in partnership with physiotherapists, to establish the areas of physiotherapy that will benefit most from this technology,” said Professor Theo Arvanitis, co-author and Director of the Institute of Digital Healthcare. (IANS)

Next Story

Cancer Patients Work Together to Make Surgical Masks in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan Cancer Patients Make Face Masks to Fight COVID-19

0
cancer masks
A group of cancer patients in Kyrgyzstan is working to meet the demand for protective surgical masks while earning funds to help pay for their treatments. Pixabay

A group of cancer patients in Kyrgyzstan is working to meet the demand for protective surgical masks while earning funds to help pay for their treatments.

The group is organized by an association known as “Together for Life,” established in July 2019. Originally, the group made handbags and purses as a kind of therapy, as well as financial aid for women overcoming cancer.

Please follow NewsGram on Instagram to get updates on the latest news

But once the demand for masks increased, the president of the group, Aigul Kydyrmysheva, told The Associated Press that they received permission from the Ministry of Health to switch to making the protective gear.

cancer masks
Members of a public association, which comprises people suffering from various types of cancer, produce medical masks, which are widely used as a preventive measure against the coronavirus outbreak, in a sewing workshop in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. VOA

Kydyrmysheva said they market their products through social media and that while bigger factories can produce masks faster, many customers have turned to them, understanding that their profits go to a good cause.

Also Read- Approx Half of Indian Do Not back Up Their Data or Files, Says Survey

The group works nearly round-the-clock, making as many as 1,000 masks a day, which earns them about $2,500 a month. In turn, they have been able to allocate about $770 a month to offset cancer treatment drugs. (VOA)