Monday October 21, 2019

Eating Walnuts Everyday Reduces Risk of Heart Diseases: Study

During the study, participants were randomly assigned to one of three study diets, all of which included less saturated fat than the “run-in” diet

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Walnuts fight anxiety, and help you sleep better. Pixabay

Eating a handful of walnuts daily may lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), says a study.

The study, published in Journal of the American Heart Association, examined the effects of replacing some of the saturated fats in participants’ diets with walnuts.

It found that when participants ate whole walnuts daily in combination with lower overall amounts of saturated fat, they had lower central blood pressure.

For the study, the researchers recruited 45 participants with overweight or obesity between the 30-65 age group.

Before the study began, participants were placed on a “run-in” diet for two weeks.

“When participants ate whole walnuts, they saw greater benefits than when they consumed a diet with a similar fatty acid profile as walnuts without eating the nut itself,” said Penny Kris-Etherton, Professor of Nutrition at the University of Pennsylvania.

Walnuts must be included in our everyday diet to fight allergies
Walnuts must be included in our everyday diet to fight allergies as well. Pixabay

The research was one of the first to try to uncover which parts of the walnuts help support heart health”.

During the study, participants were randomly assigned to one of three study diets, all of which included less saturated fat than the “run-in” diet.

All three diets substituted walnuts or vegetable oils for five percent of the saturated fat content of the “run-in” diet and all participants followed each diet for six weeks, with a break between diet periods.

Also Read- Diet Soda Doesn’t Help Kids Cut Calories: Study

The researchers found that while all treatment diets had a positive effect on cardiovascular outcomes, the diet with whole walnuts provided the greatest benefits, including lower central diastolic blood pressure (a normal diastolic blood pressure is 80).

“Instead of reaching for fatty red meat or full-fat dairy products for a snack, consider having some skim milk and walnuts,” said Kris-Etherton. (IANS)

Next Story

Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

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obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

obesity
Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

Also Read: Google Fit Can Now Track Users’ Sleep Patterns

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)