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Was Jadhav’s meeting a mere mockery of human rights?

There were many cases of infringement been brought to the notice of Indian delegation that accompanied Kulbhushan’s kin.

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Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav is an Indian national arrested in Balochistan, Pakistan, over charges of espionage. IANS
Kulbhushan Sudhir Jadhav is an Indian national arrested in Balochistan, Pakistan, over charges of espionage. IANS

NEW DELHI: The recent meet of Kulbhushan Jadhav with his wife and mother has called for some controversial debate by security experts. Pakistani officials made sure that the visit remained humiliating enough for both the women. There were many cases of infringement been brought to the notice of the Indian delegation that accompanied Kulbhushan’s kin. Kulbhushan’s wife Chetankul and mother Avanti, met foreign minister Sushma Swaraj after their meeting in Islamabad on late Monday.

The death sentence was granted to Kulbhushan Jadhav by the Pakistan army court and in no time, India approached the International Court of Justice to intervene in this case and got stay on his execution. After twenty agonizing months of his captivity, Kulbhushan was allowed to meet his family members under very scrutiny. It was only after Kulbhushan mother’s plea that Pakistan had let his family members meet, that too after diplomatic pressure been put up by the Indian government.

The meeting took place in the highly guarded building of Pakistan’s external ministry and was done under heavy surveillance of the security agencies. Later Indian government condemned the way meeting was conducted by Pakistani authority as it violated the spirit of understanding between the two countries. As per the prior negotiations, media wasn’t the part of this meeting but later the involvement of media led to the harassment of two women, as they were hurled by unnecessary questions by the media people. Media directed many questions at them and were made to hear some derogatory remarks against Kulbhushan Jadhav.

Then to add more agony, Kulbhushan’s wife and mother were forced to get away with the Hindu symbols such as bindi, mangalsutra, bangles and not only this, even to get rid of their clothes.

Kulbhushan’s mother, who belonged to a Marathi family, was restrained from speaking her own language, by the Pakistan officials who were recording the whole conversation.

JP Singh, the deputy high commissioner was initially set apart from the family members and the family was taken to the meeting without informing Singh. But after a strong protest by Singh, he informed the Pakistan officials regarding the violation of the mutual understanding that he was allowed inside.

However, none of them paid heed to Singh, and he was kept behind an additional partition. Even after strong demur, they did not allow him any access to the meeting, as discussed before.

Also, before letting her wife enter the meeting room, her shoes were taken away by the Pakistani officials and wasn’t even returned after the culmination of meeting and made his wife go back barefooted. After going through such an ordeal, the women narrated their traumatic and abusive story to Sushma Swaraj.

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Pakistan Increases Efforts To Save The U.S.-Afghanistan Peace Talks

Islamabad swiftly welcomed the remarks, which raised official expectations in Pakistan for an official invitation to Prime Minister Khan to visit Washington.

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Imran Khan, Pakistan, Afghanistan,
Imran going around world begging for funds: Sindh CM, VOA

Pakistan has intensified efforts to keep the U.S.-led dialogue with the Afghan Taliban on track, but official sources in Islamabad maintain the responsibility for the “success or failure” of the fledgling peace process rests “exclusively” with the two negotiating sides.

The caution comes as U.S. special envoy for Afghanistan reconciliation, Zalmay Khalilzad, landed in the Pakistani capital Thursday amid expectations a direct meeting could take place between his delegation and Taliban negotiators during his stay in the country.

Prior to his departure Wednesday from Kabul, Khalilzad told reporters that talks with the Taliban will “happen very soon. That’s what we’re working toward.” He did not elaborate further.

Meanwhile, in a significant move, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani telephoned Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan on Thursday and discussed the efforts being made for bringing peace to Afghanistan.

Afghanistan, Pakistan
U.S. special representative for Afghanistan reconciliation, Zalmay Khalilzad, and Pakistani Foreign Secretary Tehmina Janjua led their respective delegations in talks in Islamabad, Jan. 17, 2019. VOA

Khan’s office said in a statement that Ghani expressed his gratitude for Pakistan’s “sincere facilitation” for Afghan peace and reconciliation.

It said the prime minister “assured President Ghani that Pakistan was making sincere efforts for a negotiated settlement of the conflict in Afghanistan through an inclusive peace process, as part of shared responsibility.”

Official sources in Islamabad expected “important developments” over the next two days but they would not share further details. “There is no room for missed opportunities” under the circumstances, they insisted.

Pakistani officials maintain in background interviews with VOA that the U.S.-Taliban talks are being facilitated in the hope that they would ultimately lead to an intra-Afghan dialogue for political settlement of the conflict in Afghanistan. All sides in the peace process will share “the credit and benefits of a success,” they insisted.

“Similarly, given sincere desire and efforts of everyone, no one should be exclusively blamed if the main interlocutors fail to agree due to own lack of flexibility that is very much required from both the U.S. and the Taliban at this stage,” a senior official privy to the Pakistani peace diplomacy told VOA.

USA, Pakistan
U.S. special representative for Afghanistan reconciliation, Zalmay Khalilzad, and Pakistani Foreign Secretary Tehmina Janjua, Jan. 17, 2019. VOA

Khalilzad arrived in Pakistan from Afghanistan where he briefed Ghani and other top officials of Afghan government on the U.S.-led peace initiative.

The Taliban has held several meetings with Khalilzad’s team in Qatar and the United Arab Emirates but the insurgents have persistently refused to engage directly with the sitting administration in Kabul. Their refusal is blamed for a lack of progress in negotiations that started last summer, after American diplomats gave in to a major Taliban demand and met them directly.

Khalilzad, however, made it clear on Wednesday the insurgent group would have to engage with the Afghan government for the process to move forward.

“The road to peace will require the Taliban to sit with the Afghan government. There is a consensus among all the regional partners on this point,” the Afghan-born U.S. special envoy told reporters in Kabul.

He went on to warn that if the Taliban chose to fight over peace talks, the United States would support the Afghan government.

Afghanistan, Peace Talks, Pakistan
A general view of the Taliban office in Doha, Qatar, May 2, 2015, site of several past negotioations with the Taliban. VOA

The Taliban threatened earlier in the week to pull out of all negotiations if the United States backed away from discussing the key insurgent demand for a troop withdrawal plan and pressured the insurgents into speaking to the Afghan government.

Diplomats privy to the peace process support the U.S. effort for the Taliban to speak directly to the current administration in Kabul to resolve internal Afghan matters. They see the Ghani-led National Unity government as a “legitimate” entity possessing official representation at the United Nations and maintaining diplomatic missions in world capitals.

The last substantial talks between Khalilzad and Taliban officials took place in Abu Dhabi about a month ago and Pakistan took credit for arranging it and bringing an authoritative team of insurgent negotiators to the table.

Officials in Islamabad say that Pakistan’s “biggest contribution” has been that it has “broken the political stalemate that was there in Afghanistan for several years.”

Prime Minister Khan has repeatedly stated that finding a political settlement to the conflict in Afghanistan is a top foreign policy priority for his government. While speaking to Khan on Thursday, Ghani invited him to visit Kabul at his earliest convenience and the Pakistani leader reciprocated by inviting the Afghan president to visit Islamabad.

USA, afghanistan, taliban, peace talks, pakistan
U.S. special envoy for peace in Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, talks with local reporters at the U.S. embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Nov. 18, 2018. VOA

Pakistan has long been accused of sheltering Taliban leaders and covertly helping them orchestrate insurgent attacks, charges Islamabad rejects.

U.S. officials, however, acknowledge the “positive role” Pakistan has played in the current Afghan peace effort. The thaw in traditionally mistrusted bilateral ties was visible earlier this month when U.S. President Donald Trump announced he intended to maintain a “great relationship” with Pakistan.

Also Read: Peace Talks With The U.S. Stalled: Taliban

“So, I look forward to meeting with the new leadership in Pakistan. We will be doing that in the not too distant future,” said Trump.

Islamabad swiftly welcomed the remarks, which raised official expectations in Pakistan for an official invitation to Prime Minister Khan to visit Washington, though the Trump administration has so far given no such indication. (VOA)