Monday January 22, 2018
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Waste Segregation: Too difficult for urban households?

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By Sanket Jain

The onset of summer and the lack of initiatives by educated families will cut short the hope of a bright future for the rag pickers in Pune city.

The rag pickers from Aundh area of Pune claim that the lack of initiatives by urban societies has created a threat to their existence.

When asked to segregate the waste into wet waste and dry waste, most of the urban households rejected the idea and dumped the waste without any in-house segregation.

Enraged by the callousness, the waste pickers started complaining and, in response, most of the urban societies of Aundh and Baner area in Pune started dumping their garbage in the private trucks.

The retaliatory move by the households came as a lethal blow to the waste pickers. The action cost the employment of most of the waste pickers.

The rag pickers have to undergo severe torment to segregate the waste. On researching, it was found that most of the rag pickers did not even have proper gloves and boots required for the segregation. Unhygienic conditions coupled with the lack of immediate action by the educated people have added to their problems. The menace has imperiled the lives of the rag pickers and most of them are suffering from some disease.

In the city of Pune, more than 5000 rag pickers are involved and all of them have the same problem.

The government and the ward members seem unavailing. One of the rag pickers from the Baner area claimed that the educated people should not play politics, at least when it comes to garbage.

Waste Segregation, if not undertaken properly, can have devastating effects ranging from deaths to an outbreak of epidemics.

Waste Segregation was made mandatory by the Supreme Court and Government of India Gazette dated 3rd October 2001 under the Municipal Solid Waste Management and Handling rules 2000.

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The major Challenge is to make the Youth of the Country Entrepreneurial and not Job Seekers : Venkaiah Naidu

"The challenge for us is to make the youth entrepreneurial, and not become job seekers," Venkaiah Naidu said pointing to the NDA government's various initiatives.

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Venkaiah Naidu
Venkaiah Naidu. Wikimedia Commons
  • At a time of tepid job growth and continuing income disparities, the major challenge is to make the youth of the country entrepreneurial and not job seekers, Vice President  Venkaiah Naidu said on Thursday.

“Disparities continue to remain in India and so there is a need for inclusive growth… there is the need to take care of the suppressed, oppressed and depressed,” Venkaiah Naidu said at the Bharatiya Yuva Shakti Trust’s (BYST) silver jubilee celebrations here with Britain’s Prince Charles as the chief guest.

“The challenge for us is to make the youth entrepreneurial, and not become job seekers,” Venkaiah Naidu said pointing to the NDA government’s various initiatives to encourage youth enterprises like Startup India, Standup India and the Mudra financing scheme for underprivileged sections.

Modelled on Prince Charles’ Trust for business startups, BYST, founded by Lakshmi Venkatesan, daughter of former President R. Venkatraman, is engaged in building rural entrepreneurship — “grampreneurs” — as also enterprise among under-privileged sections, which includes business mentoring. The current BYST chairman is Bajaj Group chief, Rahul Bajaj.

“Without mentoring, it would be very difficult to set up startups, with all the business, marketing and other vital issues involved in the first two-three years,” Prince Charles said in his address at the International Mentoring Summit organized by BYST to mark its 25 years.

“What amazes me are the sheer number of jobs these young entrepreneurs had created. The aim of such a project should be to create a virtual cycle of creating entrepreneurs who can then invest in the future of business,” Charles said referring to his trust.

BYST was officially launched in 1992 by Prince Charles and expanded its operations to six major regions of India.

Out of these six regions, four — Delhi, Chennai, Pune and Hyderabad — run the urban programme while two regions — Haryana and Maharashtra — run the rural programme.(IANS)

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