Monday November 18, 2019
Home India Water conserv...

Water conservation: Lessons India can learn from California and St Kitts

0
//

water-conservation-certificate-headercrop

By Gaurav Sharma

With an exploding population, more water is being used up in agricultural activities than ever before. The rapid industrialization means that water is not being used just for drinking but for myriads of other purposes too.

Revered rivers such as Ganga and Yamuna have become dumping grounds for industrial effluents and human discharge. The utter apathy with which we have treated the water bodies of the country has reduced them from the pedestal of divinity to a specter of deplorable isolation.

According to a report published by BAIF Development Research Foundation, “Most of the Indian states will reach the water stress condition by 2020 and water scarcity condition by 2025.”

The UN report on Water Conservation also presents a dark picture. The study says that 65% of rainwater goes into the sea due to lack of proper conservation techniques.  Also, 90 % of waste water discharged in rivers fails to meet environmental norms.

What can California and St Kitts tell us?

Here, much can be learnt by the initiatives undertaken by other countries when it comes to preserving the most precious resource of mankind. The Caribbean nation of St Kitts has introduced some novel water conservation measures. These include highlighting consumer responsibilities such as respecting signage and rules established by the Water services department, reporting incidents of misuse and abuse of water, creating awareness of reusing water, propagating use of water saving devices among other things.

Such simple measures can be easily adopted in India. Beside the enforcement of clear-cut rules and regulations, people should be made more aware of the need to conserve water. The dire situation in which we find ourselves should be brought to light in no uncertain terms.

In California, every city and district with more than 3000 connections has been given a mandatory water conservation target ranging from 8 to 36 per cent, based on per capita use for the previous year.

Moreover, by rewarding communities that preserve water and burdening through fines those who consume water disproportionately, the government has been more proactive, not only in forcing people to adhere to water laws, but in transforming their outlook towards water as a precious natural resource.

Why water matters


 

 

 

 

Next Story

Once Water-Starved, Chennai’s Cantonment Area Now Boast of 13 Brimful Water Bodies

A senior Indian Defence Estates Service (IDES) officer said that additional storage space for two-crore-litre water was created

0
Water, Chennai, Cantonment Area
Water bodies -- 13 in all-- are revived and a water recycling mechanism was put in place. Pixabay

Once water-starved, Chennai’s Cantonment area and military station now boast of 13 brimful water bodies and recycling plants, and also generate their own electricity. Inspired by the innovation, the Ministry of Defence has directed its Estate Wing to implement the development work across all defence establishments.

The ministry has suggested Directorate General, Defence Estates (DGDE), an inter-services organisation of the ministry which directly controls the cantonment administration, to replicate the Chennai Cantonment area development model.

Water bodies — 13 in all– are revived and a water recycling mechanism was put in place at both Cantonment Board St. Thomas Mount cum Pallavaram and Military Station, where there was an acute shortage of water in 2018.

A senior Indian Defence Estates Service (IDES) officer said that additional storage space for two-crore-litre water was created. “Further, because of recycling plant, 2 lakh liters of treated water is used in these areas per day,” the officer said.

Water, Chennai, Cantonment Area
The ministry has suggested Directorate General, Defence Estates (DGDE), an inter-services organisation of the ministry which directly controls the cantonment administration. Pixabay

The board also created a waste management system where door-to-door collection of garbage is being carried out and then segregated into bio degradable and non-biodegradable. It is then treated in a bio-compost pit. Thereafter, biodegradable waste is put in centralised processing wind row system and then manure is created and made available for sale.

The board revived a green zone with around 2,000 plantations, set up solar power plants and a sewage treatment plant.

The solar power infrastructure set up in a year had generated electricity worth Rs 1 crore which is distributed within the cantonment areas.

Interestingly, the board has created a separate dumping zone for plastic bags. The board came up with an innovative idea of retrieval of ration milk and meat poly packets from consumers. It formalised collection and disposal, prevented littering and reaped financial benefits.

Also Read- FYI: Finding Out What Data Apps Really Collect

A senior Indian Army officer said the innovative idea was of Lieutenant General S.T. Upasani, who was the General Officer Commanding (GOC) of Dakshin Bharat Area. Lt Gen Upasani recently took charge as Director General of Information System, the crucial post in Indian Army which was lying vacant for the last two months.

Further, the board carried out campaign to revive green zone and planted 2,022 trees with 98 per cent survivability.

This development model is set to be replicated at 61 cantonments areas across the country that had been notified under the Cantonments Act, 1924, which was succeeded by the Cantonments Act, 2006. There are 62 cantonment areas. The overall municipal administration is managed by the cantonment boards, which are democratic bodies.

The ex officio president of the board is the station commander and the Chief Executive Officer, who is also the Member-Secretary of the Board, is an officer of the IDES or Directorate General, Defence Estates (DGDE). (IANS)