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Water Management can Blunt Impact of Climate Change and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Water management can blunt the impact of climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions that lead to global warming

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Water, Management, Climate
FILE - A lesser adjutant stork looks for fish in a wetland in Pobitora wildlife sanctuary, on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, Dec. 20, 2018. VOA

Water management can blunt the impact of climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions that lead to global warming, reports UN-Water, an agency that works on water and sanitation issues.

About 90 percent of all major natural disasters are water-related, according to the United Nations. Floods, storms, heat waves, droughts and other water-related events are responsible for tens of thousands of deaths, as well as economic losses that run into hundreds of billions of dollars.

UN-Water spokeswoman Daniella Bostrom Couffe says while water management can be used to mitigate the effects of climate change, the measures are largely overlooked.

“Water is not gaining that much political attention just because it is something that we all take for granted,” she said. “And, of course, we would all like to see more attention both from the public and from political decision makers about this.”

Water, Management, Climate
FILE – Islanders work on weeding and cleaning a wetland at Easter Island, Chile, Feb. 1, 2019. VOA

A recent UN-Water report cites a number of strategies for managing climate and water in a coordinated and sustainable manner. One focuses on reviving Earth’s disappearing wetlands.

Couffe notes about two-thirds of natural wetlands are vanishing because of factors including agriculture, drainage, and mining for fuel. That, she says, results in the release of massive amounts of carbon.

“Wetlands … cover about 3 percent of the Earth,” she said. “But they hold twice as much carbon as all the Earth’s forests together. So, by restoring these wetlands, that is a very effective way to limit the effects of climate change.”

UN-Water reports harmful emissions can be reduced by making water supplies more sustainable. It notes 123 countries are implementing solutions by sharing aquifers, and rivers and basins, which affect around 40 percent of the world’s population.

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The agency says lower income populations are disproportionately affected by climate change, and must be helped through targeted strategies from the richer countries that produce most of the damaging carbon. (VOA)

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Venice Presents Plan to Tackle Effects of Climate Change

The ones who hurt it those who spend only one day," Luigi Brugnaro, Venice's Mayor told Efe in an interview

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Venice, Plan, Climate
Anyone has to visit Venice with respect. You have to go for a few days, to be impregnated with it. Pixabay

In a bid to save its heritage, the Italian city of Venice has presented a plan to tackle the effects of climate change, calling for responsible tourism at this years C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen.

For years, Venice has been facing its toughest challenge ever: the risk of flooding due to rising sea levels, Efe news reported on Saturday.

However, authorities warn that mass tourism and its environmental impact have also become a challenge for the city, a cradle of history dating back more 1,500 years.

“Anyone has to visit Venice with respect. You have to go for a few days, to be impregnated with it. The ones who hurt it those who spend only one day,” Luigi Brugnaro, Venice’s Mayor told Efe in an interview.

Venice, Plan, Climate
For years, Venice has been facing its toughest challenge ever: the risk of flooding due to rising sea levels, Efe news reported on Saturday. Pixabay

The conservative politician took part in the C40 World Mayors Summit in Copenhagen, where he unveiled his plan to protect the Italian city from the effects of global warming.

His medium and long-term roadmap includes policies affecting not only the huge cruise ships that enter Venice daily but also the 25 million people that visit the city every year.

“No one should have negative thoughts about tourists. They are curious people who want to see a place like Venice and it is fair that they can do it. We only have to establish simple rules,” Brugnaro said.

From January 2020, visitors who spend less than 24 hours in Venice will have to pay a tourist tax of 10 euros to offset cleaning and maintenance costs.

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Brugnaro also plans to regulate tourist rentals through platforms such as Airbnb.

In Venice, door-to-door garbage collecting has increased recycling. However, many visitors were not aware of the existence of this service.

Venice and its lagoon were declared a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1987, but two years ago the UN organization warned the Italian city that it should take steps before 2021 to avoid being included in his “blacklist”.

The next meeting of the UN committee to monitor the progress will be held in China in 2020.

Venice, Plan, Climate
However, authorities warn that mass tourism and its environmental impact have also become a challenge for the city, a cradle of history dating back more 1,500 years. Pixabay

Venice goes on alert when a high tide reaches 80 cm. If sea-levels were to rise by 110 cm, more than 10 per cent of the pedestrian area of the historic centre would be flooded.

If the worst predictions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are fulfilled, according to which the sea level could rise 110 cm in 2100, the situation could become critical.

“It is not inevitable that it will end up being destroyed. Venice is much more alive than some say. It is a resilient city that adapts,” the Mayor told Efe news.

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The city is “a symbol for the world, one of its greatest symbols. We must set aside our selfishness and interests. If Venice is saved, the world is saved”, he added. (IANS)