Saturday December 7, 2019

New Way To Treat Pancreatic Cancer is Here: Researchers

The Decoded mechanism acts efficiently in other types of cancer resistant to current therapies

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Pancreatic Cancer
Researchers have now harnessed information to efficiently eradicate human Pancreatic Cancer cells in xenografts. Pixabay

Pancreatic Cancer is resistant to all current treatments. Patients have extremely poor chances of surviving for five years after being diagnosed but a new study found that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells.

The study, published in the journal Oncotarget, was conducted with xenografts — transplantations of human pancreatic cancer into immunocompromised mice.

The treatment reduced the number of cancer cells by 90 per cent in the developed tumors a month after being administered.

“In research published in 2017, we discovered a mechanism that causes the self-destruction of human cancer cells during their duplication (mitosis) without affecting normal cells,” said study researcher Malca Cohen-Armon from Tel Aviv University in Israel.

“We have now harnessed this information to efficiently eradicate human pancreatic cancer cells in xenografts. The current results were obtained using a small molecule that evokes this self-destruction mechanism in a variety of human cancer cells,” Cohen-Armon added.

According to the researchers, the mice were treated with a molecule called PJ34, which is permeable in the cell membrane but affects human cancer cells exclusively.

This molecule causes an anomaly during the duplication of human cancer cells, provoking their rapid cell death.
Thus, cell multiplication itself resulted in cell death in the treated cancer cells.

Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer is resistant to all current treatments. Patients have extremely poor chances of surviving for five years after being diagnosed but a new study found that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells. Pixabay

A month after being injected with PJ34 daily for 14 days, the pancreatic cancer cells in the tumuors of the treated mice experienced a relative drop of 90 per cent. In one mouse, the tumuor completely disappeared.

“It is important to note that no adverse effects were observed, and there were no changes in the weight gain of the mice, nor in their behaviour,” Cohen-Armon added.

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This mechanism acts efficiently in other types of cancer resistant to current therapies.

The molecule PJ34 is being tested in pre-clinical trials according to FDA regulations before clinical trials begin, the study said. (IANS)

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Generalised Anxiety Disorder During Teenage Can Lead to Harmful Drinking Habits

Using questionnaire and clinical interview data from more than 2,000 participants, researchers found generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 was linked to frequent drinking

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Anxiety
Research has shown that links between mental health problems, such as Anxiety disorders, and alcohol are common and complex. Pixabay

Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised Anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later.

The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence strengthens the evidence for a relationship between anxiety and later alcohol use as the researchers accounted for other factors such as adolescent smoking and cannabis use, and parental anxiety and alcohol use.

“Helping adolescents to develop positive strategies for coping with anxiety, instead of drinking alcohol, may reduce the risk of future harmful drinking. However, we cannot determine if the relationship is causal, because we used an observational study design,” said Maddy Dyer.

Using questionnaire and clinical interview data from more than 2,000 participants, researchers found generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 was linked to frequent drinking, frequent bingeing, hazardous drinking, and harmful drinking at age 18.

Generalised anxiety disorder continued to be associated with harmful drinking at age 21.

Drinking to cope was also strongly associated with more harmful drinking, but it did not appear to influence associations between anxiety and alcohol use.

Harmful drinking was measured using a special test developed by the World Health Association.

On average, adolescents with anxiety drank at more harmful levels regardless of whether they tended to drink alcohol for coping reasons or not.

Anxiety
Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised Anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later. Pixabay

“Our own research has shown that links between mental health problems, such as anxiety disorders, and alcohol are common and complex,” said Mark Leyshon, Senior Policy and Research Manager at Alcohol Change UK.

For example, anxiety can be both a result of stopping drinking and a risk factor in beginning to drink too much, as this new study suggests.

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“We need more research to help us better understand the connections between alcohol and mental health, as well as high-quality, accessible, integrated support for substance misuse and mental health issues,” Leyshon added. (IANS)