Thursday April 2, 2020

Here are Ways to Deal With Coronavirus Anxiety

How to Lower Coronavirus Anxiety and Stress

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As coronavirus spreads across the globe, everybody has to make a decision: How worried should I be about getting infected, and what should I do about it? Pixabay

Anna Alexander, a property manager in Virginia Beach, Virginia, started the day Monday thinking that she might avoid shaking hands because of the coronavirus outbreak. Then somebody stuck out a hand to shake. She took it.

“I’m a business person,” Alexander, 65, explained. “But if somebody else does it next time, I might try to be careful because of the coronavirus.”

As the viral infections spread across the globe, everybody has to make a decision: How worried should I be about getting infected, and what should I do about it?

Those decisions can have wide impacts. “Seriously people – STOP BUYING MASKS!” tweeted U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome M. Adams on Feb. 29. He explained masks aren’t effective in protecting the general public “but if healthcare providers can’t get them to care for sick patients, it puts them and our communities at risk!”

The right degree of concern for somebody who lives near a coronavirus hotspot might very well differ from that of somebody who lives far from one. In any case, say experts in how people gauge risk, it’s not a simple, cold statistical calculation. Instead, it is colored by our emotions and other psychological factors.

Coronavirus
People wear protective masks to fend off the coronavirus, while street vendors pedal masks, hand sanitizer and other disinfecting products in Queens, New York. VOA

“Emotions are the filters through which we see the facts,” says David Ropeik, a retired Harvard instructor on risk communication.

And this virus outbreak presents a list of “hot buttons … that ramp up our perception of risk” and sometimes make those perceptions differ from the evidence-based conclusions of medical officials, says Paul Slovic, a psychology professor at the University of Oregon.

For example, it’s new and unfamiliar, unlike the usual seasonal flu that kills a lot more people every year than coronavirus has. It doesn’t appear to be fully understood. And it seems hard to control, either by public health authorities or our own actions.

“We see there is no vaccine that can prevent it,” he said. It can spread through airborne droplets released by infected people, but we can’t be sure the people we meet are truly healthy, which also undercuts any sense of personal control, he said.

As Ropeik put it, in the face of a new and poorly understood threat “we start feeling like we don’t know what we need to do to protect ourselves, and that feels like powerlessness, a lack of control, like driving down the road but with your eyes closed.”

Meanwhile, the information people get from the news and social media is “not particularly reassuring,” Slovic said. “The geographic risk of this seems to be rapidly expanding” and within any country the case numbers start relatively small and then grow, without any known upper bound, he said. And reports focus on people getting sick and dying, not those who’ve become infected and had only mild symptoms, he said. “We’re getting only the scary information.”

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A man wearig a mask to protect himself from coronavirus, walks away from the entrance of the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Wash., near Seattle. VOA

What’s more, Ropeik said, “everybody is telling everybody about it” in news and social media, which amplifies the perceived risk.

Ropeik said the coronavirus triggers thinking about years of warnings about lethal pandemics. “This idea of the new disease being a major killer is an idea that has been burned into our recent fear memory,” he said.

Vincent Covello, director of the Center for Risk Communication, based in New York, provided a list of 17 psychological factors that he said can influence how individuals gauge the risks of coronavirus. For example, he said, people are often more concerned about events if they don’t trust the authorities or institutions in charge. They’re more concerned about involuntary things, like exposure to an infected person, than voluntary ones, like smoking or sunbathing. And they’re often more concerned about risks that have delayed effects, like the lag time between infection and symptoms, than those with an immediate effect, like poisoning.

Also Read- Here’s Why Smoking Cigarettes Can Make Your Mental Health Poor

So how can people minimize the risk of overreaction in themselves and others? Don’t spread the word about every little development, including minor missteps by government authorities, Ropeik says. And “don’t just share the scary parts,” but also include things like infection usually causing only mild to moderate symptoms.

Finally, “don’t be a 24/7 information victim,” he said. “Log off, put your phone down, pick up a book … Shut down your risk radar screen for a while…. You’re probably just as much at risk or safe tomorrow as you are now, whether you stay online all the time or not.” (VOA)

Next Story

Facebook Announces To Expand Community Help Feature

This is the first time Facebook has launched Community Help on a global scale and being used for a health pandemic

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Facebook
This is the first time Facebook has launched Community Help on a global scale and being used for a health pandemic. VOA

Facebook has announced to expand its Community Help feature as part of COVID-19 efforts which will help people offer help to those affected by the new coronavirus pandemic, as well as donate to nonprofit organisations.

People can access Community Help in the COVID-19 Information Center on Facebook.

“Community Help is a place for people to request or offer help to neighbours, such as volunteering to deliver groceries or donating to a local food pantry or fundraiser,” Facebook said in statement late Tuesday.

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The social networking giant is starting to roll it out in the US, the UK, France, Australia and Canada in the next few days.

Facebook
Facebook has announced to expand its Community Help feature as part of COVID-19 efforts which will help people offer help to those affected by the new coronavirus pandemic, as well as donate to nonprofit organisations. Pixabay

“We’re working to bring it to more countries in the coming weeks,” said the company.

This is the first time Facebook has launched Community Help on a global scale and being used for a health pandemic.

ALSO READ: Tesla To Supply FDA-Approved Ventilators Free of Cost To Hospitals: Elon Musk

The new coronavirus cases reached over 8.5 lakh globally on Wednesday, with over 42,000 deaths. The cases in US reached 1.8 lakh alone, according to Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. (IANS)