Tuesday January 28, 2020

Here are Ways to Protect your Bones as you Age

Here's how to protect your bones as you age

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Bones
Here are ways to take care of your bones and improve your bone health as you age. Lifetime Stock

The skeleton system of our body plays a vital role throughout our lifetime. It acts as pillar of support for our body’s framework and protects our vital organs. Additionally, bones help in storing minerals like calcium and phosphorous, as well as support the muscles for locomotion. From birth to old age our bones go through series of changes.

By the age of 30, the bone mass density reaches its peak. After which it tends to lose more bone mass than it is deposited. Osteoporosis is a frequently occurring condition developed by people as they grow old. In this condition, bones become weak and fragile. Consequently, it becomes difficult to heal a broken bone after an osteoporotic fracture.

According to statistics, adult population above the age of 50 tends to break their bones easily. Where it is seen, 1 in 2 women and 1 in 4 men fracture their bones due to osteoporosis. Hence, it is important to take care of our bones from young to old age.

Skeleton bones
By the age of 30, the bone mass density reaches its peak. Lifetime Stock

There are certain risk factors which may act as a catalyst for accelerating osteoporosis early. Lack of vitamin D and calcium in diet, lack of physical activity, being underweight, smoking and drinking, irregular hormonal levels and intake of certain medications are some common examples of risk factors.

The risk factors increase the vulnerability of osteoporosis as we age. Dr Harish Ghoota, Additional Director-Orthopaedics, Fortis Escorts Hospital, Faridabad shares the following steps to incorporate in your lifestyle to better bone health:

  • Incorporating food and drinks rich in calcium and vitamin D is a good step. For example, low-fat dairy, tofu, soy milk, green leafy vegetables, leguminous pulses, salmon and nuts are good sources for calcium. Exposing one’s body to sunlight for 10-15 minutes twice or thrice a week acts as a good source for vitamin D. Food products like fortified milk and cereals, salmon, tuna, shrimp and oysters are also good sources for vitamin
  •  Indulging in regular exercise for minimum half an hour keeps the muscles and bones strong. Strength building, weight training exercises and dancing are one of the best ways to keep fit and healthy bones
  • Avoid tobacco and alcohol abuse. According to medical advice, women should not consume more than one drink per day and men should not consume more than two drinks per day
  • With increasing age, regular bone density tests and health check-ups with doctors helps prevent excessive bone density loss.
    Exercise bones
    Exercising everyday is beneficial for your bones. Lifetime Stock

    Taking care of your bones from a young age becomes essential to prevent poor bone health. During childhood and adolescent years, bones rapidly grow. These form crucial years for developing good bone health. Proper balanced diet with increased intake of calcium rich foods and minimum one hour of physical exercise everyday helps to maintain good bone health. Additionally, adults after 30 years of age must integrate healthy lifestyle practices. These activities help to prevent poor bone health after the age of 30:

  • Exercising daily for 30 minutes least
  • Being cautious from falls or accidents
  • Going for regular check-ups
  • Regular bone density tests. Especially, after age of 50 with a fractured bone

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  • Additional intake of calcium and vitamin D over the age of 50
  • Regular medication, if prescribed by doctor, for bone density
  • Periodic Dexa scan test for high risk or vulnerable patients. (IANS)

Next Story

Children of Mothers With Diabetes Are Likely To Suffer From Heart Diseases, Says Study

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes

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Diabetes
Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified in the Study. Pixabay

Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned.

The increased rates were more pronounced among children of mothers with a history of CVD or diabetic complications, said the study published in the journal The BMJ.

“Our study provides evidence that children of mothers with diabetes, especially those with a history of CVD or with diabetic complications, had increased rates of early onset CVD throughout the early decades of life,” said study researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark.

If this association is shown to be causal, preventing, screening, and treating diabetes in women of childbearing age could be important not only for improving the health of the women but also for reducing long term risks of CVD in their offspring, the researchers added

The number of women diagnosed with diabetes before or during pregnancy has increased globally, and children of these women are more likely to have risk factors for future CVD, such as high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels. It is unclear, however, whether or to what extent exposure to diabetes in the womb increases the risk of developing CVD in offspring over a lifetime.

So an international team of researchers set out to evaluate associations between diabetes diagnosed before or during pregnancy and early onset CVD in children during their first four decades of life. They base their findings on national registry data for over 2.4 million children born without congenital heart disease in Denmark from 1977 to 2016.

Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified.

Diabetes
Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned. Pixabay

Other potentially influential factors, such as mother’s age, education, lifestyle and medical history were also taken into account. During up to 40 years of follow-up, children of mothers with diabetes had a 29 per cent increased overall rate of early onset CVD compared with children of mothers who did not have diabetes (cumulative risks: 17.8 per cent vs 13.1 per cent ).

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes, particularly heart failure (45 per cent), hypertensive disease (78 per cent), deep vein thrombosis (82 per cent), and pulmonary embolism (91 per cent).

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Increased rates were seen in each age group in childhood (before 20 years of age) and early adulthood (from 20 to 40 years of age), regardless of the type of diabetes they were exposed to (pregestational or gestational) and rates were similar for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the study said. (IANS)