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This is not just another reason why you shouldn't work from your bed, but also why your proper nighttime sleep might be more difficult to get. Pixabay

No matter who and where you are, your circadian rhythm (the basic sleep-wake cycle or body clock) is the internal process that determines your physical, mental, and behavioral changes throughout the day and night. Sleep is a critical part of this circadian rhythm and any disruption in the sleep cycle can affect your overall health.

While getting sufficient sleep every night is important, many have reported difficulty in achieving it during the pandemic. A study published in ‘Current Biology’ in June 2020 revealed that even though people working from home during the pandemic are likely to be getting more sleep time, their sleep quality is often poor and disrupted.


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A more recent study in ‘Chronobiology International’ (published July 2020) observed 203 corporate professionals and 325 undergraduate and postgraduate students in India. The study revealed that disruption of daily life routine, anxiety, isolation, greater family-and work-related stress, and excessive screen time has led to poor sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness during the pandemic.

The US National Sleep Foundation had published a statement in its journal ‘Sleep Health’ in May 2020 underlining how Covid-19 has disrupted circadian biology by making sleep more difficult. They also issued a number of guidelines to help everyone sleep better despite the situation.

Here are some tips to help you get better sleep during the pandemic.

Stick to a routine: A routine can bring a semblance of normalcy even in the most abnormal of times, so set a fixed time to wake up and go to sleep every day. Remember that it is important to bypass the snooze button on your alarm every morning and wind down for sleep at least an hour before bedtime.


A study revealed that disruption of daily life routine, anxiety, isolation, greater family-and work-related stress, and excessive screen time has led to poor sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness during the pandemic. Pixabay

Don’t work from your bed: Working from home during the pandemic might make you think working from the bed is convenient, but it is not conducive to a healthy routine. Reserve the bed only for sleep, and set up a work-station somewhere in your home away from the bed. This will also help you regulate your routine.

Don’t nap: This is not just another reason why you shouldn’t work from your bed, but also why your proper nighttime sleep might be more difficult to get. Avoid daytime naps and get rid of daytime sleepiness by being more mobile and active around the house.

Be active: Being active during pre-Covid times might have been easier, and it might not be on the top of your priority list right now, but get in at least half an hour’s exercise every day. If going for a walk is not an option, engage in passive stretching, yoga, skipping and other exercises at home to get better sleep.


Deep breathing, yoga, meditation, listening to calming music or reading a book before bedtime is great relaxation techniques that should be adopted to get a better and undisturbed sleep. Pixabay

Eat well: Watching what (and when) you eat can help promote good sleep hygiene. Not only should you have a balanced, nutritious diet, but also avoid alcohol and caffeine consumption at least two hours before bedtime.

Avoid devices: The blue light emitted by most digital devices can lead to sleep delay and disruption. Switch off the television and keep those smartphones away before getting into bed for the night.

Also Read: Immunity Booster Drinks To Replace Your Morning Tea

Relax: Deep breathing, yoga, meditation, listening to calming music, or reading a book before bedtime is great relaxation techniques that should be adopted to get a better and undisturbed sleep.

Get light: Get at least 10 minutes of sunlight every day by sitting next to a window or lounging in your balcony. Light and vitamin D play a huge role in setting your circadian rhythms straight, so this should help you be better. (IANS)


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The aim of the book is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

By Siddhi Jain

Delhi-based author Pritisha Borthakur is set to release her new book, 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories'. The 1,404-word children's book was put together to address a new kind of societal debacle in the family system. The author says the aim is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

The author who named the book after her twin sons -- Puhor and Niyor -- is a parent who has seen and heard the tales of ridicule and discrimination suffered by many in India and beyond. She says the book is an artistic illustration for kids that details how different families can live and coexist. Whether it's children with two dads or two moms, children with a single dad or single mom, and even multiracial family units, Borthakur's book teaches love, understanding, and compassion towards unconventional families.

Beyond race, gender, color, and ethnicity which have formed the bases for discrimination since the beginning of time, this book aims to bring to light a largely ignored issue. For so long, single parents have been treated like a taboo without any attempt to understand their situations; no one really cares how or why one's marriage ended but just wants to treat single parents as villains simply for choosing happiness and loving their children.

Homosexual parents, a relatively new family system, is another form that has suffered hate and discrimination for many years. Pritisha emphasizes the need to understand that diversity in people and family is what makes the world beautiful and colourful. 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race, and even differences in background

four children standing on dirt during daytime 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race and even differences in background. | Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash


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