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We And The Environment: A Seminar By EcoSphere to be Organized in Delhi

World Environment Day is celebrated every year on 5th June and is the United Nation's principal vehicle for encouraging awareness and action for the protection of our environment

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Indian, Bolivian, Zimbabwean activists unite against climate change
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New Delhi: In the wake of the World Environment Day 2018, EcoSphere – an NGO working in the area of environment conservation and awareness – will be hosting a seminar to discuss ways for creating awareness on the issue among the general public.

World Environment Day is celebrated every year on 5th June and is the United Nation’s principal vehicle for encouraging awareness and action for the protection of our environment.

Themed as We and The Environment, the seminar will bring together some best known experts and speakers on the issue of environment conservation including Magsaysay Awardee Dr Rajendra Singh.

World Environment Day is celebrated on June 5, every year.
World Environment Day is celebrated on June 5, every year.

The seminar will also take into account Indian ideology towards nature conservation. It will take place on 2nd June 2018 from 3.30 PM onwards at the Hansraj Gupta Sabhagar, 1st Floor, A-Wing, Dr. S.P. Mukherjee Civic Centre, New Delhi.

The below mentioned speakers have confirmed their participation in the seminar.
– Dr. Rajendra Singh – well-known water conservationist and Magsaysay Award winner
– M. C Metha – A lawyer by profession and a committed environmentalist by choic
– Dr. Faiyaz A. Khudsar – Diretor, Yamuna Biodiversity
– Mr. Khamu Ram Bishnoi – Environmental activist
– Mr. Sanjay Singh – of Parmarth

Also Read: IG Smart Environment: All You Need To Know

EcoSphere believes that the solution to environmental problems could be found in The Vedas. It talks about the five element by which our mother Earth is made up of. “The Pancha Mahabhuta” or “five great elements” are bhūmi (earth), ap or jala (water), tejas or agni (fire), marut – vayu or pavan (air or wind) and vyom or shunya (space or zero) or akash (aether or void).

The time has come to take concerted efforts to protect each essential element of the environment. At EcoSphere, we believe that only mass awareness and education will help us our targets related to environment conservation. Taking care of these essential elements will only help us resolve the existing problems with the environment.

People must be enough conscious regarding the protection of Environment
People must be enough conscious regarding the protection of Environment. Pixabay

This seminar, hosted by EcoShphere, will provide a forum for high-level discussion on key issues concerning the protection of the environment. Also, we encourage the youngsters to be a part of the celebrations and obtain the opportunity to share their ideas and activities for making our world cleaner, greener, better and brighter. So let us all pledge to do something, at least one single thing, as our contribution of the World Environment Day.

EcoSphere’s series of the dialogue under “अथाह प्रवाह” has clearly evolved as the most important gathering of leaders from all over the world. It focuses on challenges of attaining sustainable development worldwide.

Also Read: Being Vegan Good For Environment: Study

About ECOSPHERE
EcoSphere came into existence with the single aim of serving the society in the area of Environment, Energy, Education and sustainable development. EcoSphere is starting this mission to save our nature, and make people aware about the environment, clean energy, sustainable education, self-employment and overall progress, through different programs. EcoSphere is a dynamic and versatile organization with a global vision and national as well as local focus. EcoSphere is providing leadership role in the field of environment, community development, education, sustainable development and resource management since its inception.

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U.S. President Donald Trump’s Take on Climate Change

Trump's backpedaling on the U.S. commitment raises questions about the prospects.

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Pollution, U.S., Trump
The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyoming. VOA

“I’m not going to put the country out of business trying to maintain certain standards that probably don’t matter,” President Donald Trump told VOA when asked about the economic impacts of climate change.

When not denying its existence, the Trump administration’s approach to
climate change essentially comes down to three arguments: the United States has already cut its greenhouse gas emissions more than other countries, regardless of any international agreement; regulations to cut emissions come with high costs and few benefits; and those regulations would put the United States at a disadvantage because other countries will not follow.

“When you look at China, and when you look at other countries where they have foul air,” Trump added, “we’re going to be clean, but they’re not, and it costs a lot of money.”

As U.N. climate negotiations get under way in Poland to work out rules for implementing the Paris climate agreement — from which Trump intends to withdraw the United States — experts weigh in on the administration’s claims.

Pollution, Trump
A bus gives off exhaust fumes in Alexandria, Virginia. VOA

Emissions cuts

It’s true that the United States has reduced its greenhouse gas production more than any other country. U.S. emissions peaked in 2005. In the last decade, they have fallen by about 13 percent, according to the BP Statistical Review of World Energy.

But the United States was the world’s leading producer of greenhouse gases until 2006. And, others have made bigger cuts by percentage. Hungary’s levels, for example, decreased 14 percent.

U.S. emissions started to fall when the fracking boom took off.

The new technique of hydraulic fracturing turned the United States into a major natural gas producer. As the price of natural gas has dropped, it has been steadily replacing coal as the dominant fuel for electricity generation. Because burning natural gas produces far less carbon dioxide than coal, greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.

More recently, renewable sources such as solar and wind power have started to make inroads on the power grid.

Donald Trump, democrats, government,
U.S. President Donald Trump. VOA

While U.S. emissions have fallen since the 2000s, China’s have soared.

The country pursued astonishing economic growth with an enormous investment in coal-fired power plants. China is now the leading producer of greenhouse gases by far, roughly doubling U.S. output.

Cost-benefit

Trump has argued that regulations aimed at limiting greenhouse gas emissions would hobble the U.S. economy. He has moved to undo the Obama administration’s proposed rules on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and efficiency standards for vehicles and appliances, among others.

Critics question whether those regulations would cost as much Trump suggests.

“None of these policies were going to have dramatic increases in the prices that consumers would see,” Duke University public policy professor Billy Pizer said. He added that normal price swings would likely swamp the cost of the regulations Trump targets.

Trump, pollution
Paris depends on countries following through on increasingly ambitious emissions cuts. Pixabay

The emissions reductions the Obama administration pledged in Paris “were built largely on a continuation of the coal-to-gas transition and a continuation of growth in renewable energy that’s already happening,” said Alex Trembath of the Breakthrough Institute research center. As such, he added, they “don’t imply a large cost. In fact, they imply a marginal increased benefit to the U.S.”

Those benefits come, for example, because burning less coal produces less air pollution, which lowers health costs.

Not to mention the direct results of climate change: wildfires, floods, droughts and so on.

“We have enough science and enough economics to show that there are damages resulting from us releasing CO2 into the atmosphere. We know that that is not a free thing,” University of Chicago public policy professor Amir Jina said. “And yet, we are artificially setting it as free because we’re not paying the price of that externality.”

He said economists nearly unanimously support a carbon tax, a cap-and-trade program or some other way to put a price on carbon emissions.

Collective action

Few nations have taken the necessary steps to meet the emissions reduction pledges they made in Paris, according to the most recent United Nations emissions gap report.

Paris Agreement, CLimate, trump
Developed countries are being urged to honour Paris Agreement. Flickr

Even those pledges would fall far short of the Paris goal of limiting global warming below 2 degrees Celsius, the report adds. Reaching that target will take “unprecedented and urgent action.” A 2016 report said an additional $5.2 trillion investment in renewable energy will be necessary worldwide over the next 25 years.

Trump’s statement — “we’re going to be clean, but they’re not, and it costs a lot of money” — sums up why nations are reluctant to act: no one wants to take on burdens that they think others won’t.

“It’s the thing which has been dogging action on climate change for generations,” Jina said.

“We only really solve the problem if everybody acts together,” he added. “And if enough people are not acting, then we don’t.”

Paris depends on countries following through on increasingly ambitious emissions cuts.

Each country decides what it is willing to do. Every five years, countries come together and show their progress.

Climate Change, Trump, disasters
President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. VOA

“You over time build confidence in each other,” Pizer said. “Ideally, you ratchet up the commitments as you see your actions reciprocated by other countries.”

Trump’s backpedaling on the U.S. commitment raises questions about the prospects.

However, the first of these check-ins is five years away. Trump can’t formally withdraw the United States from the agreement until 2020.

Also Read: Paris Adopts Climate Action Plan, Aims to Achieve a ‘Zero-Carbon’ Future

Pizer notes that the predecessor to the Paris Agreement, the Kyoto Protocol, failed in part because it imposed caps on countries’ carbon emissions, and most of the world balked.

“In my mind, this is the best we can do,” he said. “If there were a different way to do it, I’d be all over that.” (VOA)