Friday November 16, 2018

New Wearable Patch That Helps in Monitoring Blood Pressure

The patch was tested on a male subject, who wore it on the forearm, wrist, neck and foot. Tests were performed both while the subject was stationary and doing exercise

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Scientists have developed a new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin and could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision.

The new soft, stretchy ultrasound patch uses ultrasound waves to continuously record the diameter of a pulsing blood vessel located as deep as four centimeters (more than one inch) below the skin.

It can be worn on the skin and provides accurate, precise readings of central blood pressure each time, even while the user is moving. And it can still get a good reading through fatty tissue.

“By integrating ultrasound technology into wearables, we can start to capture a whole lot of other signals, biological events and activities going on way below the surface in a non-invasive manner,” said Sheng Xu, Professor at the University of California San Diego.

Physicians involved with the study, reported in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, say the technology would be useful in various inpatient procedures.

Blood Pressure
Representational image. Pixabay

“This has the potential to be a great addition to cardiovascular medicine,” said Brady Huang, co-author and radiologist at the varsity.

“In the operating room, especially in complex cardiopulmonary procedures, accurate real-time assessment of central blood pressure is needed — this is where this device has the potential to supplant traditional methods,” he noted.

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Central blood pressure is the pressure in the central blood vessels, which send blood directly from the heart to other major organs throughout the body.

Medical experts consider central blood pressure more accurate than peripheral blood pressure — measured with an inflatable cuff strapped around the upper arm, –and also say it’s better at predicting heart disease.

The patch was tested on a male subject, who wore it on the forearm, wrist, neck and foot. Tests were performed both while the subject was stationary and doing exercise. (IANS)

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Microsoft Planning for Next version of Smart Glasses in Order to Monitor Blood Pressure

The aim is to shrink the device to such an extent that it could become a clip-on that works with anyone's regular glasses, the report added

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blood pressure
Microsoft developing next version of BP-monitoring smart glasses. Pixabay

Microsoft is developing the next version of its smart glasses, called Glabella, that can work as a cuff-less, wearable and unobtrusive blood pressure measuring device, according to a new report.

The device incorporates optical sensors, processing, storage, and communication components, all integrated into the frame to passively collect physiological data about the user without the need for any interaction, according to a paper published on Proceedings of the ACM Journal of Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies.

Glabella continuously records the stream of reflected light intensities from blood flow as well as inertial measurements of the user’s head.

From the temporal differences in pulse events across the sensors, this prototype derives the wearer’s pulse transit time on a beat-to-beat basis.

Microsoft
Logo of Microsoft outside it’s office. Pixabay

A person’s pulse transit time — the time delay following each heartbeat as the pressure wave travels between two arterial sites — provides an indirect measure of blood pressure, according to a report in IEEE Spectrum.

 Although the glasses did well in a test run, they are not yet ready to hit the store shelves as the Microsoft researchers plan to evaluate the Glabella glasses in a clinical setting.

The team is also developing a next version of the device to make it more power efficient while making the frame smaller, the report added.

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Currently, a small chargeable coin battery keeps the device running.

The aim is to shrink the device to such an extent that it could become a clip-on that works with anyone’s regular glasses, the report added. (IANS)