Monday December 16, 2019

New Wearable Patch That Helps in Monitoring Blood Pressure

The patch was tested on a male subject, who wore it on the forearm, wrist, neck and foot. Tests were performed both while the subject was stationary and doing exercise

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Photo: doctormurray.com

Scientists have developed a new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin and could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision.

The new soft, stretchy ultrasound patch uses ultrasound waves to continuously record the diameter of a pulsing blood vessel located as deep as four centimeters (more than one inch) below the skin.

It can be worn on the skin and provides accurate, precise readings of central blood pressure each time, even while the user is moving. And it can still get a good reading through fatty tissue.

“By integrating ultrasound technology into wearables, we can start to capture a whole lot of other signals, biological events and activities going on way below the surface in a non-invasive manner,” said Sheng Xu, Professor at the University of California San Diego.

Physicians involved with the study, reported in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, say the technology would be useful in various inpatient procedures.

Blood Pressure
Representational image. Pixabay

“This has the potential to be a great addition to cardiovascular medicine,” said Brady Huang, co-author and radiologist at the varsity.

“In the operating room, especially in complex cardiopulmonary procedures, accurate real-time assessment of central blood pressure is needed — this is where this device has the potential to supplant traditional methods,” he noted.

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Central blood pressure is the pressure in the central blood vessels, which send blood directly from the heart to other major organs throughout the body.

Medical experts consider central blood pressure more accurate than peripheral blood pressure — measured with an inflatable cuff strapped around the upper arm, –and also say it’s better at predicting heart disease.

The patch was tested on a male subject, who wore it on the forearm, wrist, neck and foot. Tests were performed both while the subject was stationary and doing exercise. (IANS)

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Blood Test Can Identify Risk of Night-Time High Blood Pressure in People

Most people experience lower blood pressure at night

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Blood Test
A simple Blood Test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patient's cardiovascular risk, said the study. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a simple Blood Test can help identify people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called “reverse dipping” that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep.

Most people experience lower blood pressure at night. The new study, published in the European Respiratory Journal suggests a potential cause for reverse dipping that may help patients with sleep apnea get the help they need before cardiovascular disease develops.

“We can now identify those with OSA at the highest risk of cardiovascular problems in order to prevent them from developing additional complications,” said David Gozal from the University of Missouri School of Medicine in the US.

“We can treat those patients more aggressively to ensure they adhere to therapy and use their continuous positive airway pressure device (CPAP) properly,” Gozal said.

The researchers studied 46 patients diagnosed with OSA. They ranged in age from 18 to 70. Fifteen participants were identified to have a rise in blood pressure during sleep, while the remaining 31 participants had blood pressure readings that either remained the same or declined at night.

The researchers collected a blood sample from each participant to study the messages cells produce and send to each other through microscopic packages called exosomes.

Blood Test
Researchers have found that a simple Blood Test can help identify people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called “reverse dipping” that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep. Pixabay

“We found that the cell messages coming from participants with night-time elevated blood pressure were different than those transmitted in subjects with normal blood pressure,” Gozal said.

“The altered messages caused the cells that line the blood vessels to become dysfunctional. Those disturbed vessels allowed inflammatory cells to enter the vessels’ walls, causing hardening of those vessels and leading to cardiovascular disease.”

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Gozal said the cell message discovery will help clinicians personalise treatment for each patient diagnosed with OSA.

A simple blood test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patient’s cardiovascular risk, said the study. (IANS)