Thursday July 19, 2018

Weekly Social Hour is all you Need to Help Dementia Patients

Nearly 70% people living in care homes suffer from dementia, so it is only fair that the staff in the care homes have the right training to provide good quality dementia care

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Dementia treatment. Wikimedia
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  • Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction will be very helpful for people with dementia living in care homes
  • This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire
  • Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care

Washington DC, July 17, 2017: According to a recent survey, quality of life can be improved and agitation can be reduced, while saving money, for people with dementia living in care homes with the help of person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction.

The University of Exeter, King’s College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust led the findings from a large-scale trial that were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 (AAIC).

This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire. The study involved two ‘care staff champions’ at each home who were trained over four day-long sessions, to take simple measures that such as involve talking to residents about their interests and decisions around their own care. When combined with just one hour a week of social interaction, it improved quality of life and reduced agitation.

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Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care. Researchers believe that the next key challenge is to roll the programme to the 28,000 care homes in the UK that will benefit the lives of the 300,000 people with dementia living in these facilities.

According to ANI report, the lead researcher in the project, Clive Ballard said that people with dementia who are living in care homes can be considered among the most vulnerable in our society. “Incredibly, of 170 carer training manuals available on the market, only four are based on evidence that they really work. Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society,” she added.

Doug Brown, Director of Research for Alzheimer’s Society, feels that 70% of people living in care homes suffer from dementia. That is why it is necessary for the staff to have the right training to provide the best quality dementia care.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter @dubumerang

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A Landmark Study Links Herpes 6 and 7 with Alzheimer’s Disease

The findings also showed multiple points of overlap between virus-host interactions and genes associated with Alzheimer's risk

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A Landmark Study Links Herpes 6 and 7 with Alzheimer's Disease
A Landmark Study Links Herpes 6 and 7 with Alzheimer's Disease. (IANS)

Scientists have found up to two times higher level of human herpes virus among people with Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting the potential role of the viruses in the development of the progressive brain disorder.

Herpes virus causes contagious sores, most often around the mouth or on the genitals.

The study found unusually increased level of human herpesvirus named human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7 ) in the brains of the people with Alzheimer’s than those without the disorder.

“The hypothesis that viruses play a part in brain disease is not new, but this is the first study to provide strong evidence,” said Richard J. Hodes, Director from the US National Institutes of Health.

“Our work identified specific biological networks that offer new testable hypotheses regarding the role of microbial defense and innate immune function in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s,” said Joel Dudley from the Institute for Next Generation Healthcare at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

alzheimers
Patient of Alzheimer’s. Pixabay

The findings also showed multiple points of overlap between virus-host interactions and genes associated with Alzheimer’s risk. Multiple viruses impact the biology of Alzheimer’s disease across domains such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

“If it becomes evident that specific viral species directly contribute to an individual’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s or their rate of progression once diagnosed, then this would offer a new conceptual framework for understanding the emergence and evolution of Alzheimer’s at individual, as well as population, levels,” Dudley explained.

In the study, published in the journal Neuron, the team initially performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions in more than 600 samples of postmortem tissue from people with and without Alzheimer’s to quantify which genes were present in the brain, and whether any were associated with the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s.

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Using different computational approaches, the team uncovered a complex network of unexpected associations, linking specific viruses with different aspects of Alzheimer’s biology.

They examined the influence of each virus on specific genes and proteins in brain cells, and identified associations between specific viruses and amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and clinical dementia severity.

Further, they incorporated 800, RNA sequencing samples and observed a persistent increase of HHV-6A and HHV-7 in samples from individuals with Alzheimer’s. (IANS)