Saturday February 16, 2019

Weekly Social Hour is all you Need to Help Dementia Patients

Nearly 70% people living in care homes suffer from dementia, so it is only fair that the staff in the care homes have the right training to provide good quality dementia care

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Dementia
Dementia treatment. Wikimedia
  • Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction will be very helpful for people with dementia living in care homes
  • This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire
  • Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care

Washington DC, July 17, 2017: According to a recent survey, quality of life can be improved and agitation can be reduced, while saving money, for people with dementia living in care homes with the help of person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction.

The University of Exeter, King’s College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust led the findings from a large-scale trial that were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 (AAIC).

This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire. The study involved two ‘care staff champions’ at each home who were trained over four day-long sessions, to take simple measures that such as involve talking to residents about their interests and decisions around their own care. When combined with just one hour a week of social interaction, it improved quality of life and reduced agitation.

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Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care. Researchers believe that the next key challenge is to roll the programme to the 28,000 care homes in the UK that will benefit the lives of the 300,000 people with dementia living in these facilities.

According to ANI report, the lead researcher in the project, Clive Ballard said that people with dementia who are living in care homes can be considered among the most vulnerable in our society. “Incredibly, of 170 carer training manuals available on the market, only four are based on evidence that they really work. Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society,” she added.

Doug Brown, Director of Research for Alzheimer’s Society, feels that 70% of people living in care homes suffer from dementia. That is why it is necessary for the staff to have the right training to provide the best quality dementia care.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter @dubumerang

Next Story

Researchers Identify New Mechanism to Prevent Alzheimer’s

The team next plans to test this approach in additional animal studies and eventually in human trials using small molecule inhibitors targeting eEF2K

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In Alzheimer's disease, patients start losing memory, Pixabay

Researchers have identified a novel mechanism and a potential new therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), says a new study on mice.

Alzheimer’s is characterised by profound memory loss and synaptic failure. Although the exact cause of the disease remains unclear, it is well established that maintaining memory and synaptic plasticity requires protein synthesis.

The function of the synapse is to transfer electric activity (information) from one cell to another.

“Alzheimer’s is such a devastating disease and currently there is no cure or effective therapy for it,” said Tao Ma, Assistant Professor at Wake Forest School of Medicine in the US.

A lady suffering from Alzheimer’s. Flickr

“All completed clinical trials of new drugs have failed, so there is clearly a need for novel therapeutic targets for potential treatments.”

For the study, the team has shown that AD-associated activation of a signaling molecule termed eEF2K leads to inhibition of protein synthesis.

Further, they wanted to determine if suppression of eEF2K could improve protein synthesis capacity, consequently alleviating the cognitive and synaptic impairments associated with the disease.

They used a genetic approach to repress the activity of eEF2K in Alzheimer’s mouse models.

Cognitive Impairment
Alzheimer’s disease patient Isidora Tomaz, 82, sits in an armchair in her house in Lisbon, Portugal. VOA

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, showed that genetic suppression of eEF2K prevented memory loss in those animal models and significantly improved synaptic function.

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“These findings are encouraging and provide a new pathway for further research,” said Ma.

The team next plans to test this approach in additional animal studies and eventually in human trials using small molecule inhibitors targeting eEF2K. (IANS)