Tuesday March 31, 2020

Weekly Social Hour is all you Need to Help Dementia Patients

Nearly 70% people living in care homes suffer from dementia, so it is only fair that the staff in the care homes have the right training to provide good quality dementia care

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Dementia treatment. Wikimedia
  • Person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction will be very helpful for people with dementia living in care homes
  • This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire
  • Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care

Washington DC, July 17, 2017: According to a recent survey, quality of life can be improved and agitation can be reduced, while saving money, for people with dementia living in care homes with the help of person-centred activities combined with just one hour a week of social interaction.

The University of Exeter, King’s College London and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust led the findings from a large-scale trial that were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2017 (AAIC).

This trial was conducted with more than 800 participants living with dementia across 69 care homes in South London, North London and Buckingham-shire. The study involved two ‘care staff champions’ at each home who were trained over four day-long sessions, to take simple measures that such as involve talking to residents about their interests and decisions around their own care. When combined with just one hour a week of social interaction, it improved quality of life and reduced agitation.

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Also, this particular approach saved money in comparison with the standard care. Researchers believe that the next key challenge is to roll the programme to the 28,000 care homes in the UK that will benefit the lives of the 300,000 people with dementia living in these facilities.

According to ANI report, the lead researcher in the project, Clive Ballard said that people with dementia who are living in care homes can be considered among the most vulnerable in our society. “Incredibly, of 170 carer training manuals available on the market, only four are based on evidence that they really work. Our outcomes show that good staff training and just one hour a week of social interaction significantly improves quality of life for a group of people who can often be forgotten by society,” she added.

Doug Brown, Director of Research for Alzheimer’s Society, feels that 70% of people living in care homes suffer from dementia. That is why it is necessary for the staff to have the right training to provide the best quality dementia care.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter @dubumerang

Next Story

Inflammation in Brain Can Lead to Dementia: Study

Inflammation in the brain linked to several forms of dementia

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Inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought. This is a health news.

Inflammation in the brain – known as neuroinflammation – has been recognised and linked to many disorders including depression, psychosis and multiple sclerosis. It has also recently been linked to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

For the study, published in the journal Brain, the researchers set out to examine whether neuroinflammation also occurs in other forms of dementia, which would imply that it is common to many neurodegenerative diseases.

The team recruited 31 patients with three different types of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). FTD is a family of different conditions resulting from the build-up of several abnormal ‘junk’ proteins in the brain. “We predicted the link between inflammation in the brain and the build-up of damaging proteins, but even we were surprised by how tightly these two problems mapped on to each other,” said study researcher Thomas Cope from University of Cambridge in the UK.

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For the study, published in the journal Brain, the researchers set out to examine whether neuroinflammation also occurs in other forms of dementia, which would imply that it is common to many neurodegenerative diseases. Pixabay

According to the researchers, patients underwent brain scans to detect inflammation and the junk proteins. Two Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans each used an injection with a chemical ‘dye’, which lights up special molecules that reveal either the brain’s inflammatory cells or the junk proteins.

In the first scan, the dye lit up the cells causing neuroinflammation. These indicate ongoing damage to the brain cells and their connections. In the second scan, the dye binds to the different types of ‘junk’ proteins found in FTD.

The researchers showed that across the brain, and in all three types of FTD, the more inflammation in each part of the brain, the more harmful build-up of the junk proteins there is. To prove the dyes were picking up the inflammation and harmful proteins, they went on to analyse under the microscope 12 brains donated after death to the Cambridge Brain Bank.

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“There may be a vicious circle where cell damage triggers inflammation, which in turn leads to further cell damage,” sad study researcher Richard Bevan Jones.

The research team stressed that further research is needed to translate this knowledge of inflammation in dementia into testable treatments. (IANS)