Saturday July 21, 2018

Weight Loss May Reverse Heart Rhythm Disorder

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes

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Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.
Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications. Pixabay
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Losing weight may reverse or reduce the progression of irregular heart rhythm disorder among obese people, claim researchers, including one of Indian origin.

The findings showed that reducing weight by 10 per cent along with management of associated risk factors can reduce the effects of Atrial fibrillation (AF), a leading cause of stroke which can lead to heart failure among overweight people.

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes.

Stop Obesity
Stop Obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first time that evidence has been found that if people who are obese and are suffering from atrial fibrillation the disease can be alleviated by losing weight and treating lifestyle factors,” said lead author Melissa Middeldorp from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

AF is a progressive disease in which initial short, intermittent symptoms develop into more sustained forms of the condition. Obesity and lifestyle factors are associated with its progression.

Also Read: Overweight in Middle Age Linked to Low Breast Cancer Risk

“This study shows that weight-loss and treating lifestyle factors is an essential component for effectively managing AF, in many instances being an alternative to surgery or drug intervention,” added Professor Prashanthan Sanders from the varsity.

In the study, published in the journal Europace, the team analysed 355 overweight people who lost varying amounts of weight. (IANS)

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New Wearable Patch Sensor to Boost Diagnosis for Heart Rhythm Disorder

The participants self-applied the wearable sensor patch for two weeks and returned it for analysis

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The team found that six per cent of the group developed Afib and nearly three per cent among the controls developed the disease.
The team found that six per cent of the group developed Afib and nearly three per cent among the controls developed the disease. (IANS)

A wearable patch that acts like a sensor can effectively improve the diagnosis rate for heart rhythm disorder without interfering with routine activities, scientists have found.

Atrial fibrillation (Afib) disorder, is characterised by increased or irregular heart rhythm that increases the risk of stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved wearable patch acts like a sensor and performs active electrocardiography (ECG) screening to detect irregular heart rhythm condition as well as recent heart attacks.

The device resulted in more people receiving critical preventive therapies, which might have gone undiagnosed, said the researchers while emphasising the use of digital medicine technologies to identify undiagnosed Afib disorder in at-risk populations.

“Our study shows an almost threefold improvement in the rate of diagnosis of AFib in the those actively monitored compared to usual care,” said Steven Steinhubl, Director of digital medicine at Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) in California, US.

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Atrial fibrillation (Afib) disorder, is characterised by increased or irregular heart rhythm that increases the risk of stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases. Pixabay

“Timely diagnosis of AFib more effectively can enable the initiation of effective therapies and help reduce strokes and death,” added Steinhubl, who is also a professor at Scripps Research Institute in the US.

The study, published in the journal JAMA, included data from 5,214 individuals for one year, with one third of the group being assigned to the monitored cohort and the rest being observational controls.

The participants self-applied the wearable sensor patch for two weeks and returned it for analysis.

Also Read: Stem Cell Thearpy To Treat Heart-Failure

The team found that six per cent of the group developed Afib and nearly three per cent among the controls developed the disease.

“This study demonstrates the utility of a digital approach not only to diagnosing asymptomatic AFib, but to the clinical research field as a whole,” Steinhubl explained. (IANS)

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