Wednesday March 20, 2019

Weight Loss May Reverse Heart Rhythm Disorder

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

Losing weight may reverse or reduce the progression of irregular heart rhythm disorder among obese people, claim researchers, including one of Indian origin.

The findings showed that reducing weight by 10 per cent along with management of associated risk factors can reduce the effects of Atrial fibrillation (AF), a leading cause of stroke which can lead to heart failure among overweight people.

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes.

Stop Obesity
Stop Obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first time that evidence has been found that if people who are obese and are suffering from atrial fibrillation the disease can be alleviated by losing weight and treating lifestyle factors,” said lead author Melissa Middeldorp from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

AF is a progressive disease in which initial short, intermittent symptoms develop into more sustained forms of the condition. Obesity and lifestyle factors are associated with its progression.

Also Read: Overweight in Middle Age Linked to Low Breast Cancer Risk

“This study shows that weight-loss and treating lifestyle factors is an essential component for effectively managing AF, in many instances being an alternative to surgery or drug intervention,” added Professor Prashanthan Sanders from the varsity.

In the study, published in the journal Europace, the team analysed 355 overweight people who lost varying amounts of weight. (IANS)

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Gene Therapy Can Help Correct Heart Rhythm Disorder

However, considerable research is still needed before a treatment can be arrived at that is suitable for human patients

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genes
The study modified the levels of the protein encoded by a single gene known as GPR39.  Pixabay

A novel gene therapy uses an implanted LED device to reset a racing heart immediately and automatically, paving the way for pain-free treatment for patients with heart rhythm disorder.

The therapy detects fast arrhythmias in the atrium of a rat’s heart and sends a signal to a LED device placed near the heart.

“The flash of light from this LED then causes the heart to generate an electric current itself to halt the arrhythmia,” said lead investigator Daniel Pijnappels at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

“This is made possible by using gene therapy to introduce specific light-sensitive proteins into the heart. This restores the heart’s normal rhythm immediately and automatically,” he added.

According to the researchers, this could represent a great improvement on the current way of stopping atrial fibrillation.

The heart attack brings about activation of certain genes which stay as a permanent memory in genes. Pixabay

Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder in clinical practice. The current treatment, known as cardioversion, is based on administering an electric shock to the heart, which has to be done in the hospital under general anaesthesia because of pain.

For many patients, this is the only treatment to immediately stop atrial fibrillation because drugs or an operation are ineffective.

“The bioelectronic defibrillator can stop atrial fibrillation without an electrical shock. In this way, the heart can be reset in a fully automated manner and at any time,” Pijnappels said, in the paper reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Also Read- Novel Treatment Offers Promise to Stop Parkinson’s

“We anticipate that this treatment for atrial fibrillation could improve both the patient’s quality of life and their prognosis,” he added.

However, considerable research is still needed before a treatment can be arrived at that is suitable for human patients, the researchers noted. (IANS)