Tuesday January 22, 2019

Weight Loss May Reverse Heart Rhythm Disorder

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

Losing weight may reverse or reduce the progression of irregular heart rhythm disorder among obese people, claim researchers, including one of Indian origin.

The findings showed that reducing weight by 10 per cent along with management of associated risk factors can reduce the effects of Atrial fibrillation (AF), a leading cause of stroke which can lead to heart failure among overweight people.

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes.

Stop Obesity
Stop Obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first time that evidence has been found that if people who are obese and are suffering from atrial fibrillation the disease can be alleviated by losing weight and treating lifestyle factors,” said lead author Melissa Middeldorp from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

AF is a progressive disease in which initial short, intermittent symptoms develop into more sustained forms of the condition. Obesity and lifestyle factors are associated with its progression.

Also Read: Overweight in Middle Age Linked to Low Breast Cancer Risk

“This study shows that weight-loss and treating lifestyle factors is an essential component for effectively managing AF, in many instances being an alternative to surgery or drug intervention,” added Professor Prashanthan Sanders from the varsity.

In the study, published in the journal Europace, the team analysed 355 overweight people who lost varying amounts of weight. (IANS)

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Secret of Maintaining Weight Loss

At the same average body weight, participants who consumed the low-carb diet burned about 250 kilocalories a day more than those on the high-carb diet

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Weight Loss
Here's the secret to maintaining weight loss. Pixabay

Staying in shape is no mean job as people often find that they quickly regain the weight that they had shed after a rigorous regime of dieting or exercise. Eating a diet low on carbohydrates may, however, help them maintain weight loss, new research has found.

This is because eating fewer carbohydrates increases the number of calories burned, said the study published in the journal BMJ.

For the study, the researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital in the US enrolled 234 overweight adults aged between 18 and 65 to an initial weight-loss diet for about 10 weeks.

Body Positivity is not only about feeling good about our own body type but also appreciating other body types as well. Pixabay
Representational image. Pixabay
 Of these, 164 achieved the goal of losing 10 to 14 per cent of body weight.

The participants were then randomised to follow high, moderate or low-carbohydrate diets for an additional 20 weeks with carbs comprising 60, 40 and 20 per cent of total calories, respectively.

The results showed that over the 20 weeks, calories burned was significantly greater on the low-carbohydrate diet versus the high-carbohydrate diet.

Also Read- Shutdown Called in Kerala After Two Women Claimed To Have Entered in Sabarimala Temple

At the same average body weight, participants who consumed the low-carb diet burned about 250 kilocalories a day more than those on the high-carb diet.

“If this difference persists – and we saw no drop-off during the 20 weeks of our study – the effect would translate into about a 20-pound weight loss after three years, with no change in calorie intake,” said Cara Ebbeling from Boston Children’s Hospital. (IANS)