Tuesday November 20, 2018

Weight Loss May Reverse Heart Rhythm Disorder

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay
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Losing weight may reverse or reduce the progression of irregular heart rhythm disorder among obese people, claim researchers, including one of Indian origin.

The findings showed that reducing weight by 10 per cent along with management of associated risk factors can reduce the effects of Atrial fibrillation (AF), a leading cause of stroke which can lead to heart failure among overweight people.

People who lost weight experienced fewer symptoms, required less treatment and had better outcomes.

Stop Obesity
Stop Obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first time that evidence has been found that if people who are obese and are suffering from atrial fibrillation the disease can be alleviated by losing weight and treating lifestyle factors,” said lead author Melissa Middeldorp from the University of Adelaide in Australia.

AF is a progressive disease in which initial short, intermittent symptoms develop into more sustained forms of the condition. Obesity and lifestyle factors are associated with its progression.

Also Read: Overweight in Middle Age Linked to Low Breast Cancer Risk

“This study shows that weight-loss and treating lifestyle factors is an essential component for effectively managing AF, in many instances being an alternative to surgery or drug intervention,” added Professor Prashanthan Sanders from the varsity.

In the study, published in the journal Europace, the team analysed 355 overweight people who lost varying amounts of weight. (IANS)

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Weight Loss Surgery To Combat Womb Cancer in Obese Women

"But for those that choose it, gastric sleeve or bypass surgery can now be seen as a preventative measure for womb cancer."

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Breast Cancer
Early rising women at lower risk of breast cancer: Study. Pixabay

Undergoing bariatric surgery to combat obesity can prevent women from developing womb cancer also known as uterine or endometrial cancer, claims a study.

The findings, led by scientists from the University of Manchester, showed that women who had gastric sleeve or bypass surgery for obesity found that precancerous tissue in their womb reverted to normal tissue when they lost weight.

“For super obese women, quick access to weight loss surgery has benefits beyond improving diabetes and risk of heart disease. It can also reduce womb cancer risk,” said Emma Crosbie, clinical senior lecturer from Manchester.

“Losing weight through dieting is also likely to be effective, but we know that dieting is very hard to do and weight lost is often re-gained,” she said.

In the study, published in International journal of Cancer, the team examined nearly 100 women with an average BMI of over 50 — considered to be super obese — had biopsies taken from their wombs during gastric sleeve or bypass surgery.

Obese post-menopausal women produce oestrogen from their fat stores. But as they no longer ovulate, the lack of progesterone allows the cells in the womb to grow, which increases the risk of cancer.

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Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Inflammatory responses and insulin production are also changed in obese women and can cause cells in the womb to grow.

“Because the reversal of precancerous changes in the womb was so quick, we think the metabolic consequences of weight loss surgery was crucial,” said Crosbie.

However, the researchers stressed that the surgical option was not for everyone, because it was no an easy choice.

You May Also Like to Read About- Processed Meat And Carbonated Beverages Puts You At Higher Risk of Kidney Failure

“It changes your relationship with food forever, as you’ll be eating smaller meals more frequently, and it is important to remember that surgery can be a hazardous procedure,” said Crosbie.

“But for those that choose it, gastric sleeve or bypass surgery can now be seen as a preventative measure for womb cancer.” (IANS)